PistolWorld.com banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Re: Good .40 pistol?

rpf289 said:
When I get older I might look into purchasing a pistol primarily for self-defense. I'm still debating it, as I know that carrying a firearm increases my risk, but then again I'll also feel safer anyhow.

Can you please explain how carrying a firearm increases your risk?

Risk of what?


Mike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
re: Good .40 pistol?

Basically, the way I see it, if you carry a weapon, or are trained in martial arts, your risk goes up. If you can defend yourself, you will, and when you fight back against an aggressor, well it just gets more dangerous.
Well, of course, one can always march into the ovens without defending oneself, eh?

We've all heard the news reports of how someone fought back against a mugger or an intruder instead of just giving in.
And we've all seen video tape of cashiers giving up the money and then being shot anyway. :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
re: Good .40 pistol?

I wouldn't say the 9mm projectile is "tiny". It measures .355, hich is 88% of your 40cal. It's not quite as simple as a bigger bullet is better (though it helps). Mass, Velocity, and projectile design have a lot to do with it, and are affected by a number of factors. There is ALOT of debate out there on this, and it's application to real world carry/defense. A little google time should give you enough information to ask more questions which apply to your situation.

Sig makes fine guns, and so does glock, and S&W, and Kimber, and.... What you want is reliablity, probably at the expense of match accuracy, which comes with a price. Reliability is worth that price. Many police units around the country carry Sigs or Glocks. If you like the guns, than thats a good endorsment... Remember practice and training are one of the best invesments you'll make.

Best of luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
re: Good .40 pistol?

It's time to educate the youngin'. Being able to defend yourself decreases the risk. Why? Bad Guys seem to prefer an easy job. If they see a decent-sized guy walking down the street that looks confident in his ability to walk down the street unmolested, chances are pretty good he'll be left alone. A small woman jogging down the street with no place to conceal anything would be the preferred way to go. Think of it like this: if you were gonna rob a house, would you pick the one that has spent shotgun shells scattered around the front porch, or the one with a big "Gun Free Home" sign in the window?

As for guns, .40 S&W is quite acceptable as a defensive round. So is 9mm Luger, .45ACP, .38Spl, .357 magnum, etc. Use proper ammunition in just about any gun, and it'll be just fine. Knowing how to shoot the thing and being intimately familiar with it are much more important than what you're carrying. As the old saying goes, "It ain't the arrow, it's the indian". Spend a lot of time at the range with it. Also, know as much about concealed carry in your state as you can. The legal issues are serious. There are a lot of guns out there in .40. HK, Beretta, SIG, Glock (bleh), S&W, Kimber, and just about every other pistol manufacturer carries one.

Go do some homework.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
606 Posts
re: Good .40 pistol?

Unless you are quite familiar with and comfortable with firearms, I would advise you to start your handgun experience with a revolver rather than an autoloader.

Autos have their place, but you must be intimately familiar with their operation, and must practice often so that a failure to fire, failure to eject, or failure to feed produces an automatic response.

Revolvers are substantially less complex than an autoloader - and more reliable as a result, a fact that many folks think makes a wheelgun preferable as a defensive weapon. If you have a failure to fire with a DA revolver, you just pull the trigger again.

A good small-frame DA .357 wheelgun, like a Ruger SP-101, is simple to operate, packs a heck of a punch, and will last several lifetimes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Re: re: Good .40 pistol?

rpf289 said:
I also remember reading about how a revolver is the perfect choice for someone who just wants something for self-defense as it can sit in a drawer for four years, to be used only once at 3 AM when an intruder kicks in your front door and it'll still fire...as opposed to your auto you never maintain just doesn't do anything.
Well, according to what a few people say, springs will not wear out just by sitting with tension on them. Even though that might be true, I wouldn't want to bet my life on it. Yes, there are no springs that could be worn out on a loaded revolver, but depending on who all lives with you, you probably don't want to leave a loaded one sitting around all the time. The really cool part about DA revolvers is that they're quick to load from a box of ammo. Swing out the cylinder, drop them in, close it. That, and you don't have to worry about if the load will cycle properly or not. For reliability, autos these days are usually pretty good, but I'd still opt for a sixgun.

For a CCW revolver, I'd go for a small 5-shot like a Ruger SP101 or a S&W 442. If you don't plan on CCW, I'd go for a medium frame one like a Ruger GP100 or a S&W 686. The extra size and weight help tame recoil and give you a bit longer sighting radius and better sights for more accurate shots, plus you'll enjoy prolonged magnum-shooting sessions a lot more. I have a GP100 with a 4" barrel, and it's my woods gun. When I go out in the field with just my .22LR or no rifle at all, I always have that on my hip loaded with magnums. I hardly notice it's there, but it makes for a nice "insurance policy". It's a real hoot to shoot at the range with .38s, too. Most people I know who go revolvers never go back. They've got their advantages, and they've got style.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
640 Posts
re: Good .40 pistol?

First off, before running out and buying a handgun there are a few steps you should take.
My first suggestion is to take a firearms safety class even if you have no interst in hunting. Do this for two reasons: first you will get a basic idea of how to safely handle any type of firearm, not just a handgun and a start to understanding the terminology used for firearms. Second, it is often needed for further education such as getting a carry permit.
The next step I would suggest is to sign up for an NRA or other similar course for beginner shooters. These can take a bit of leg work to find but asking at various shooting ranges is a good place to start as is the NRA website. Hiring an instructor is also a good option as the close personal attention can speed along the learning process and give you a sound foundation in the basics of safety and shooting. Waiting until you do some shooting yourself will actually be harmful in the long run as bad habits will have to be erased before good ones can take root. Be honest with the instructor as to your abilities and desires at first contact to avoid problems and misunderstandings.
As for the idea that carrying a gun "adds" to the danger level, bulltweed. The less knowledgable one is towards self defense options and the fewer options one has at their disposal increases risk. Carrying a gun only adds to the options I have available to me in case of trouble, it is not the only option. The knowledge I learned in the class and what I further learned from life and other classes allows me to make even better choices.
As for a first gun, it is best to start with a .22 LR in my opinion. Cost of gun is relatively low, ammo cost is down right cheap compared to any centerfire, and it is easy to control which makes learning to shoot much easier. Whether semi-auto or revolver doesn't matter too much though $200 will get you a very reliable semi-auto while an equivalent revolver will start higher.
As far as self defense calibers, anything 9mm or larger is fine. Shot placement is much more important than caliber though some may dispute that. The FBI is like many agencies and individuals in that they are looking for a handgun that will always stop an aggressor rather than spend the time, effort, and money on additional training.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
re: Good .40 pistol?

I'll echo Ug's sentiments on the .22LR revolver. If you're completely new to shooting, especially handguns, you'll want to start with one of those. You can spend all day practicing, and you won't have a sore hand or an empty bank account at the end. 550 rounds of cheap .22 runs about $10. That takes a fairly long time to shoot in a revolver. It won't smack you around or make loud noises, so it'll be much more friendly to shoot. In turn, you'll want to shoot it more. Practice your 4 Golden Rules of gun safety, learn the fundamentals of trigger pull, sight picture, stance, and breath control, and go from there. A class will make sure that happens. Once you're proficient, then you'll be ready for something meaner.

Besides, a good .22LR revolver will be the one gun in your collection that you'll ALWAYS take with you. They're just too much fun to leave at home! I'm hoping to add a Bearcat to my collection one of these days, to give my Single Six a bit of company.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
re: Good .40 pistol?

Uglydog's comments are right on - get to a class - and spend some time at the range - and shoot a variety of guns.

.40 S&W is a very good caliber, in my opinion, and I think the Sig's are very good carry weapons - but don't go down that path until you've had some training. I'm a big 1911 fan / a big revolver fan / but in a .40 I like the Sig 226 models ( like the 226 SAS ) but the 229 SAS is a nice gun as well. It depends on what fits your hand / how you feel about it (down the road).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
re: Good .40 pistol?

I have to admit that .40 S&W is one of my favorite pistol cartridges. It's in the top 5, anyway :wink: . The next 1911 I get may just have to be chambered for it. Yes, it's borderline sacrelige, but dangit, it's a great combo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
re: Good .40 pistol?

I have another S&W 4043 .40 with three 11 round mags in flat stainless. Also has a wrap around grip. Still have the S&W model 10 38 special I would like to sell too. Here are the prices and pics. All prices include shipping to Florida residents ONLY.

S&W 4043 .40 with three 11 round mags $300 shipped





This is from the S&W forum. It's the .40 I'd buy. :wink:
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top