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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have (at least) two questions:
(completely hypothetical situation)

1 - Can anybody identify the pistol in this picture? I believe it's from WWI, and it was probably purchased in Turkey or Eastern Europe.

There appears to be a crown or a hat stamped into the front left of the trigger-guard, and there is a capital "E" in a circle stamped below the muzzle. As you can see in the picture, this pistol has a grip safety, and as nearly as I can tell, the gun is chambered for .380.



2 - How would one go about registering a gun if the last owner died before transferring it?
 

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It's a Hungarian Femaru Model 37 handgun, a neat little straight-blowback pocket pistol. Design is credited to Rudolf Frommer, better known for the thoroughly screwy Frommer Stop pistol. As with just about anything in the handgun world, it borrows liberally from a John Moses Browning design, in this case the Euro favorite M1910. enough that when the Germans appropriated the design for use by the Luftwaffe during WWII, in caliber 7.65mm (.32 ACP). (The German models had a manual safety and the Waffenamt factory code "jhv.") They seem to have a reputation as reasonably reliable little pistols.

The gun was produced between 1937 and 1944.

the gun was available in .32 and .380, so your hunch about the caliber is probably correct.

As for two, I can't give you a definitive answer, other than: it's good to have a gun around that no one knows about...

Cool piece you have there.

Cheers,
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you very much, Bunnyman! That is a lot of cool information to have. I was completely mistaken about the era of this pistol. Happy hunting!
 

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FEG made some great pistols. For detailed information on yours and on Hungarian small arms in general, try this link:
www.sunblest.net/gun/FegAP.htm

I have owned s few FEG pistols, and own one now, and they have all been very good performers. I carry mine nearly every day.

Enjoy it.

mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the link, dogngun / Mark. It helped me out quite a bit, because I was scratching my head trying to figure out the slide release.

It takes deliberate effort on the part of the wielder to disable the gun by removing the slide (unlike, for instance, a Beretta). Also not incorporated into the few pistol designs I recognize is the grip safety, which strikes me as a more refined, perhaps even more reliable, mechanical safety than a thumb switch. Between the way that the barrel locks the slide in place and the grip safety, this pistol seems like it would have evolved from current designs, rather than come from 1937.

Many thanks to both of you for helping me to identify, to understand, and to appreciate this piece of history better.
 

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Re: re: Can anybody identify this pistol?

Bunnyman said:
Wow, dogngun, that website rocks.
Bunnyman: I get the idea you like FEG's as I do. Glad I could show you the site -Don't ever let anyone tell you FEG's are junk!

(Better yet, spread that nasty rumor and keep the prices low!)

FWIW, I have my FEG .32 in my pocket right now.

All the best,

mark
 
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