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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking for a 9 mm pistol and one of the gun shops here has a CZ75 that he thinks i should get. Well, it is a decocker model, and beyond what he tried to explain to me about it, thats all i know. I have no experience with 9 mm pistols, only revolvers, but i liked the way the trigger felt on this gun but i have heard some bad things about this type of pistol. I want something to carry sometimes but i want to target shoot with it on a regular basis. Any help? Thanks
 

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what you probably saw/handled was a CZ 75 BD. CZ also makes several other guns in different flavors too.

CZs in general are great guns imo. you will find people that dont care for them as in anything, to each his own. CZs are also unknown for alot of people for whatever reason and at one time they were a really good value, but prices have risen somewhat, so that value isnt as good as before.

If you heard some "bad things" about this gun why not state them. no one can address them unless you do. Ive heard "bad things" about every gun and everything made by man. You will find that the web allows alot of "squeeky wheels" to be read/seen/heard. There are people out there that feel that if they got a lemon (just 1 bad apple or bad CS) that every gun after that is bad and even now and in the future. SOme people expect 100% perfect on their purchase and if the gun has a "heavy" trigger pull or whatever, its no good. There are people that will complain about machine marks, plastic grips, painted finish and other things. Some people think that the CZ should come with targer triggers with action jobs.

you could do worst or better depending on what you end up with.

if i were you, i would find a gun rental range and do some testing of the 9s they have to rent. if you have any friends that shoot, try theirs too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your advice, the thing people said about this gun were mostly they thought it wasnt a very safe design with the decocker. Since i am new to 9mm, i am just trying to do a lot of research before i buy. I went to a range and tested a springfield xd compact, it seemed a little small, seemed to have some rattle to it, and made my wrist hurt the next day. I am a woman, so i think i was just nervous and was gripping it too tight. I love the Ruger SR9, but i cant find one to try out first. I am concerned about the trigger on it being too heavy, thats just what i have read about them. I have looked at lots of different guns but i keep coming back to the SR9.
 

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julken said:
Thanks for your advice, the thing people said about this gun were mostly they thought it wasnt a very safe design with the decocker. Since i am new to 9mm, i am just trying to do a lot of research before i buy. I went to a range and tested a springfield xd compact, it seemed a little small, seemed to have some rattle to it, and made my wrist hurt the next day. I am a woman, so i think i was just nervous and was gripping it too tight. I love the Ruger SR9, but i cant find one to try out first. I am concerned about the trigger on it being too heavy, thats just what i have read about them. I have looked at lots of different guns but i keep coming back to the SR9.
its good to do some researh, but be careful of the source. everyone has an "opinion" and some arent knowedgable. some of its hearsay and what they heard from their cousins, college, roomate, exwifes mechanic. some people also dont know what they are talking about too. i dont claim to know everything, but i do know what i have and have used in my time behind the trigger.

If you look at CZs web site, you will/should see some of the specs. Most if not all of the CZs have whats called a "firing pin block (FPB)". alot of the newer guns do to. Now there are some CZs that dont, but those are used in competition or some of the earlier versions. there are users that will have the FPB removed to aid in trigger smoothness/lightness.

the concept of the FPB is that the FP wont contact the primer UNLESS the trigger is pulled. IE. If you "drop" your gun, it should not discharge.

there are seveal gun mfg that use a "decocker" to drop/lower the hammer. Some people belive that the user should NOT lower the hammer manually due to an Accidental Discharge (AD). If the user does not know how to do it properly, it can be an issue and can have an AD.

with regards to the "rattel" in the XD. Its most likely the ammo in the magaine. some magazines will rattle with ammo and some of those will cease to rattle depending on how many rounds are left or the postion of those rounds. Sometimes the rattle could be a loose slide or part in the gun. Most of the times its nothing to be concerned of.

The XD and Rugers SR9 have trigger systems know as "striker" fired. The FP is cocked when you pull/rack the slide. the drawback is that if you get a round with a hard primer or misfire, you have to pull/rack the slide again. "Stirker" fired guns can have a ligher trigger too. But its not good to have a too light trigger on a HD/SD gun since you maynot know if you pulled the trigger under stress. there are some "stiker" fired guns that dont need to have the slide pulled/racked for the FP to be reset.

The CZ 75BD has what is know as a DA/SA or Double Action/Single Action trigger. (they do have SAO Single Action Only models) its like a revolver. You pull the trigger and it will keep on moving/releasing the hammer.

If you are not use to a handguns, i would suggest you find a knowledgable instructor in your area. If possible, go and watch/observe their teaching techniques and see if you like how they teach their students. Sometimes its good to get some 1 on 1 instructions to see how you are doing and to correct any issues before they become bad/ingrained habbits. he/she maybe able to see whats going on with your wrists. btw, when it comes to handguns, its better to "go with the flow" instead of trying to "resist" the recoil.

also, you may want to look at a revolver. they are simple to use and if you get a dud round, all you have to do is to pull the trigger again. on semi autos you have other things to do to clear the malfunction. The instuction should show you the drill.

some gun shops will have a range out back or one where you can "test" the gun.

what you can also do is if you do find an SR9 in a shop, ASK if you can "dry fire" the gun. they may put in some snap caps for you to do so, but always ASK before "dry firing" a gun.

fwiw, since you are a woman, i will say that all of the ones i took shooting were much better shots from the start and were better/faster learners. considering alot of women are not into guns, its interesting that they are better shots from the get go. im not sure if there is suppose to be some cosmic significance to that or its mother natures idea of a joke.
 

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i agree with others.

Rent several guns to shoot

It's well worth the money to get what you want

Don't let price and other peoples opinions sway you too much (every body has favorites) , just gather advise, but make up your own mind.

Buying quality "used" guns is better (imo) than cheap new guns with some exceptions.

Good luck finding your new gun.

:)
 

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I've never owned a CZ but from those that I shoot with that have them find them to be a dependable firearm. The decocker is a nice feature I have them on three Ruger P series and a FNP-40 I own. In short a way to bring the hammer back to safe with out touching the trigger. I've yet to hear where a decocker has failed, I have seen where a person trying to lower the hammer manualy has has an AD more than a few times.
 

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dondavis3 said:
I've yet to hear where a decocker has failed, I have seen where a person trying to lower the hammer manualy has has an AD more than a few times.
If a DA/SA doesn't have a decocker the best way to lower the hammer is to put the safety on. This lowers the hammer safely on the vast majority of DA/SA style pistols. The pistols are carried condition two, which means a bullet in the chamber, safety off, and hammer down. since the first shot is double action the chances of a accidental discharge even with the safety off is very unlikely. KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL READY TO FIRE!. So as soon as you lower the hammer with the safety you put it right back into "fire" and holster the weapon. The beauty of the decocker is it does both with one motion. It's no more or less safe since there is really no reason to keep the safety on anyway.
Some people will probably start howling that I said to leave the gun in "fire" but I would like to point out that revolvers don't have a safety and rely on the long double action trigger pull for safety as do the half assed double action ish sort of trigger you get on a glock. The big difference in a DA/SA is after that first shot the gun is in hand and pointed in a safe direction so you get that good, crisp single action trigger pull.
Good luck and I recomend you get something like the CZ75 that has a 22lr conversion so you can shoot lots, cheap. Shooting a pistol well takes a lot of practice. But it's lots of fun to practice if it doesn't cost you your kids college fund.
 

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The CZ is a fine handgun that has been copied by several different manufacturers. I once had a Tanfogilio (Italian) clone, the EAA Witness, in .40 caliber. It was a fun gun, but it had a lot of problems. Lesson learned - don't buy the clone, get the real thing! The CZ75 was the weapon of choice of the Russian Special Forces, and these guys are pretty on top of things that go BANG! The ergonomics are terrific - it feels very good in your hand and it is comfortable to shoot in any caliber. The decocker may seem (and sound) a little scary, but it is actually the safest way to decock a loaded semiautomatic. It just takes a little getting used to.

I bought a Ruger SR9 just so I could shoot the cheaper Russian 9mm ammo. I almost bought the CZ75, but I was in a "Buy American" mood that day, and I'm not sorry that I did. The SR9 surpassed all my expectations. I have only put about 200 rounds through it so far (the cheap Russian stuff) and I haven't had one failure to fire yet. And (added bonus) it has been extremely accurate. It is very comfortable to hold and shoot. Not as good as the CZ, but it is lighter, and here it cost less than the CZ. Now I know that CZ has come out with a polymer version of the CZ75, which is lighter, but I have not seen one yet.

Bottom line, both are fine guns and I'm betting that you will be happy with either one you get. If you just have a problem with the decocker model of the CZ, then you dealer can easily get you the model with the full manual safety. If he says he can't, you need to find a new dealer. If you like the SR9 better, no problem. You'd be hard pressed to find a company with better Customer Service than Ruger. You may never have to use it, but if you do, they're the best. That's another factor that drew me toward the Ruger.

Let us know what you decide on, and good shootin'.
 

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I have owned and do own several pistols both revolvers and semi-automatics. I have a CZ in .40 S&W that is one of the most accurate
pistols I have ever had. CZ makes fine firearms.
 

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I had a Jericho 941 that is an Isreali clone of the CZ 75 and it was a great gun. Put several thousand rounds through it with no failures related to the gun. Had a few FTF due to some bad ammo but not the guns fault. You cant go wrong with CZ 75. I recently purchased a Smith & Wesson M&P 9c and I have been loving it. If you like the SR9 take a look at the M&P's also.

 
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