Pistol World Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have a Glock 21 (45 ACP) and I'm getting into reloading, and have a few questions:
I'm aware of the issue regarding cast bullets in the factory barrels, but are plated bullets ok?
Does this model tend to favor any particular bullet type/weight, and are there feeding issues with SWC or FP bullets?
Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
the gun will be more accurate when you match the barrel twist rate to the grain of bullit you use. the greenhill formula will help you find the better performing bullits. devide 150 by the length of the bullit in calibers and then devide again by its diamiter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Wow spider, nice info thier. good going, i have to remember that.

I just wanted to add that i purchased one of those Lone Wolf barrels for my glock 22 and i shoot lead thru it. You see them advertised for $99.00 dollars $107.00 something like that i bought it threw dillon.

and i also been buying the plated type of bullets and it was also a concern. Although i think i read that you really have to load the plated type bullets to +p type levels before the fouling concern take place.

Seems like the lone wolf barrel head spaces the bullet or supports it better than the Glock barrel does. It is a little narow in the tube. compared to the Glock barrel. I had a problem with 200 grainers fitting in them. But my problem was solved when i bought the factory crimp die from lee. Which i should have in the first place. i have this die for all my other caliber dies. Senior moment when i ordered?

I would recomend this barrel, especially for the shooting lead part. I wont say it is more accurate than the glock stock barrel. or any less accurate. However i do carry with the stock barrel, and the clip is stuffed with factory fodder.

Old school thinking has me believing a loose gun is more of a fighting mans gun, Years ago the 45s that were accurized were very tight fitting. this inturn lead to some dependabiltiy issues. Early days pistol smiths had thier work cut out in making the target models tight as to tack driving for its intended use. A carry gun such as a Colt often even had a rattle sound that can be heard. Loose tolerances meant it was always going to go bang.

Now the manufactures came a long way, giving us the best of both worlds. like the Kimber custum models for instance, as well as many others.

So this always stays in the back of my head with the Glock. Although i have to admit i cant remember the Lone Wolf barrel causing me any issues in stove piping or cycling or such. And it was a drop in barrel so they must compensate for something.

But there is always that Murfys Law thing that comes to mind so i roll that way. Come to think of it i should have a bulk box of 250 lead rounds i bought at dicks sporting goods a couple of years ago, somewhere around here, Friend had buoght one of those Hi point rifles and we never did shoot it. I did not have the glock at that time. Thanks for reminding me. Have to look for those lead bullets.

Take care Jack :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Your post reminds me of a question . If I have a wolff 45 acp barrel for my g-30 . can I use 200gr lrn and swc in the .452 size or will I switch to .451?? I do have a 4 point lee turret press with FC die. thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
People worry too much about the absolutely correct bullet diameter, without doing what is required to even know what the correct bullet diameter is.
Do you know what your groove diameter is? It is within SAAMI specs if it is 0.450-0.454". A jacketed or plated bullet usually performs best if it is the same as groove diameter. A cast/swaged lead bullet usually performs best if it is 0.001" larger than groove diameter. Sometimes, a jacketed bullet 0.001" below groove diameter might be better and sometimes a lead bullet that is exactly groove diameter might be better--though I have only heard about these sort of results.
Next, 0.454" bullets have been used for years in .45 autos, so they certainly will work.
Like all reloading, the rule of loading, and whenever I read a question like this I wonder if it is being remembered, is to start with the starting load and work up. Since I have had a couple of starting loads be max or over with MY lot numbers of components, I always check at least two sources and start with the lowest starting load.
If one checks the latest two Hornady manuals, one will find that for .38 Super, they have the same data for all their jacketed 121-125gn 0.355-0.357" bullets, indicating that they don't have any concerns about using a slightly larger/heavier bullet.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
106 Posts
Glock factory barrels tend to be generously proportioned. A not too hard .454 swaged lead bullet should shoot without excessive leading. (Personally, I wouldn't want to use a very hard .454 lead bullet, though.)

Berry plated lead bullets are .452 in diameter. I've run many thousands of them through both of my G-21's; all without a problem, and in front of fairly hot powder charges, too.

Generally I've always shot 230 grain RN, .451 jacketed, and .452 plated bullets through my own G-21's. If your swaged lead bullets have a Brinell Hardness Number greater than, say, 12 you're going to be able to use the factory barrel to shoot these bullets; and barrel leading shouldn't be a significant problem.

The general rule is that Glocks are designed to feed RN bullets; and other bullet shapes may, or may not feed well. Glock chamber mouths have excessive rebates; and, although tighter now than they used to be, the case heads are only minimally supported.

I've fired several magazines of lead SWC bullets through a G-21 exactly once. They all fed perfectly; and there was no barrel leading. They were very hard; I couldn't easily scratch them with a knife blade; and I'd guesstimate the BHN to be between 14 and 17.

My suggestion would be to load up a half dozen, or so, rounds with the atypical bullet configuration you have, and try running them through your G-21. The only configuration I'm pessimistic about is the FP's. You've just got to try it, and see what happens.

There is, by the way, NO REAL ISSUE with shooting HARD-CAST lead bullets in a Glock polygonal rifled barrel. Glock, GmbH is the only pistol manufacturer that uses cold-forged polygonal barrels and, also, warns against shooting lead.* However, considering the limited experience of a typical Glock owner that's, probably, a wise decision on the Glock factory's part.

This said, there are tens of thousands of Glock owners who regularly fire HARD-CAST lead bullets in their Glock pistols. Me? I've been doing this for more than a decade. Until you know what you've got, simply watch the bore for signs of premature leading. If excessive leading starts to build up after, say, 25 - 50 rounds, stop and scrub the barrel out.

If I were unsure about a particular lead bullet, I'd stop and check the bore every 6 to 12 fired rounds, and until I knew, for certain, what I was firing. Shooting lead bullets in a Glock means:

(1) Depending upon specific caliber, keeping your velocities at or even well below 1,000 fps.

(2) Lubing your lead bullets with Alox, and/or use a gas check.

(3) Using the correct (predetermined) diameter lead bullet for your particular barrel. Generally, you don't want to be more than .001" over the actual bore diameter; but, depending upon the actual diameter, .002" (or even larger) can be doable.

(You'll need to, 'slug' the barrel in order to know what the actual bore diameter is that you've got to work with.)

(4) Staying away from soft swaged (commercial lead wire) bullets with a BHN below 10.

(5) Regularly checking the bore for leading while you're shooting. The only way to do this is to use a brush and solvent, OK!

A final suggestion: Keep the C.O.A.L. to 1.250 - 1.260"


* Since I originally wrote this reply Heckler & Koch has come out with a similar warning against the use of all lead bullets in their (modified) polygonal pistol barrels. Why? I'd say it's just, 'good business' on H&K's part.

Magnum Research, and CZ-USA, who also use (modified) polygonal pistol barrels have, as yet, not issued such a warning; and given the considerable state of general ignorance about handloading among a majority of the pistol shooting public - and, in particular, first time pistol buyers - I'd say this is, quite possibly, a very good general recommendation for most pistol purchasers to follow.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top