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Hello I am new to the forum and pistol shooting. My only experience was in the military with the Beretta 92FS (did not like it much but had no choice) and a friends 1911 .45 (which I really enjoyed).

The advice I need is rather basic. I am looking a buying a .22 handgun for just target shooting. I am currently leaning towards the Beretta U-22. I know a lot of people do not like the look of this product but I am more concerned about the function. I have looked at the Ruger Mark III (seemed a little small) and the Browning (worried about difficulty with take down). Is there a reason to avoid the Beretta other than the appearance?

My second question is about targets. I know to start out on paper but are the metal reactionary targets safe. I am a little concerned about ricochets. I know you are supposed to use only soft tip projectiles on these targets and set them up at least 33' away. Will the soft tips effect the function of the auto?

My third and final question is in reference to the sites. The front site post on the U-22 seems a little thick. I know it is set up for a scope mount. Would a red dot site be a better option for a beginner of (as I suspect) would it be a better idea to get used to the regular iron sites first.

Thank you all for your input and have a good day.
 

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I like the bull barreled Ruger Mark III, myself. Very accurate sights for me. I would stick with paper unless you have lots of room... just in case. :wink:

22/45™ Mark III™
The .22 caliber Ruger 22/45 Mark III pistols (including Hunter) have the same grip angle and fire control locations as the famous 1911 pistol, making them the perfect low-cost trainer.

BEST FOR: Target shooting, plinking, and small game hunting.
 

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Ihaven't heard anythingbad regardng the Beretta other than its looks. If you like the looks then that is a gun worth considering. I prefer the Buckmark and don't find the take down too onerous compared tosome other guns in my safe. The Smith & Wesson 22A isn't a bad gun either considering its price. The Ruger 22/45 would also be a good choice.
As for targets, I shoot a lot of paper ones and have several spinners, dingers, and resetting versions. They all have their place with the metal ones being the most active. Mine all recommend the shooter to be at least 20 yards away though I do stand closer with some. Targets of opportunity like sticks, dirt clods, grasshoppers, etc. are also favorites but one needs a fair amount of space and/or a good backstop to safely shoot these. I use all types of bullets with mine, solid lead, hollow points, and full metal jackets all seem to work the same. Some brands of lead bullets have a lubricant that may necessitate more frequent cleaning as they can gum up the chamber but it does take quite a few rounds to reach this point.
The factory sights would be best to start with. They are likely much better than you are and by the time they are the weak link you will have enough experience to determine what new sighting system is best for you. It is also good to know how to readily use the irons in the event something happens to whatever optical sight you choose. If you are set on getting an optical sight, a red dot or one of the holographic ones would be much better than a scope. Scopes have a tendency to magnify one's shakes and jitters which do not help build confidence.
Hope this helps.
 

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I haven't heard of any negative comments on the Beretta either - other than looks. But I'm not a big Beretta fan either. But I shoot with a guy once in a while that has one - he likes it - and I've shot it a little and it seems ok. But personally, I like the Buckmark - or the Smith and Wesson mod 41 a lot better.

I think it just comes down to your personal preference in guns.

There isn't anything wrong with picking up a 1911 in a .45 ACP and getting a conversion kit for it to .22LR. The kits aren't perfect but they work very well. Kind of give yourself the best of both worlds. But no matter what - have some fun with the process too. Looking for the right gun is at least half the fun ....... and the next one ...... and the one after that....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks to everyone for there input.

I have thought about the 1911 with the conversion kit but I am just not sure how into hand gun shooting I will become (that is part of the excitement). I primarily shoot at skeet and occasionally sporting clays. My wife and I both enjoy that. I am just trying the hand gun as kind of an experiment at this point so cost is a little bit of a factor.

I am looking at the .22 because it is inexpensive, cheap to shoot, and no recoil so the wife can try as well. Right now she is not interested but she said the same thing about skeet till she hit her first target. Now she loves shooting and will not even let me touch "her" shotgun. I also think this is a good place to pick up basics.

The looks do not bother me because quite frankly I am to new to know any better. The Rugar .22/.45 sounds interesting though and I will have to check that out. I did not even know ruger made another .22.

I will be using this on a public range (we have no back yard yet), so I think for now I will stick with paper and maybe plastic bottles just for safety. I would hate for something to happen. Better safe than sorry.

I think I am going to stick with the basic iron sites for now. There is no real sense in getting the red dot since I am not that proficient yet and, quite frankly they do look a little funny.

Does any know where to get information about basic pistol marksmanship? THANKS again for your input and have a good day.
 

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Qwert, if nothing else, go to your local range and ask! I don't know of a shooter who won't help you. If that doesn't work... go to your local gun store and ask... between the two, you'll score someone to help you out. :wink:

p.s. Where are you from? If you let us know, perhaps one of the members is close enough to help! :D
 

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Lots of good books out there - but some of them are really focused on some of the specific handgun competitions - but look at your local book store or gun range / gun shop and see what they have.

Instruction is pretty easy to come by at most ranges - but a lot of guys will give you a hand once you get to know them a little or see them around the range once in a while.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Paul F. I am in North Carolina. Might be a little bit of a trip for most of you but I appreciate the offer.

I will have to try the store. Them seem pretty knowledgeable there but I am still looking for additional information. You can never have to many options until you are really confused.

BigDog

I would love to go the instructor route but the range we use is public and primitive. There is no charge to use the range but there are no facilities or staff either. They have the concealed hand gun courses here as well and if we decide we like it we may go that route just for the instruction (at least I hope they teach basic marksmanship).

Thanks again to everyone for the information. I really do appreciate the friendly help.

Have a good weekend.
 

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Unless things have changed lately on the beretta 22's the trigger is much better on all the other competitors mentioned. I have a buckmark, and take down is straight forward. Take down and re-assembly on the rugers is a little more difficult. The Grip on the S&W22A is a handful, and doesn't work great for shooters with smaller hands.

If you go with the ruger or browning you can get the bulk loader gizmo which saves reload time...

The ruger is the only all steel model. and more aftermarket upgrades are availble for it than any of the others..

best of luck...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I just wanted to thank everyone for the help. After much consideration I ended up going with the Ruger Mark III .22/45. The first break down (actually reassembly) was a bit of a bear but after going back to the shop for some remedial training it is actually quite easy now. I should be taking it out this weekend for the initial testing.

Thanks again for all the information.
 
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