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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been reloading 40 for a long time now and collecting a mismash of brass and finally came across possibly some once fired glock brass. Noticed my Springer 1911 would not go into full battery. Started troubleshooting, one thing lead to another, realized I had some nice case bulging going on. Out of 1000 cases there were random bulgers showing up.



A sized case fits my chamber nicely



A bulged case doesn't even come close. Can't imagine what did that.



The sized case mic out at .418 The bulger at .430



Loaded shells are run through the Lee final sizing die and mic no greater than .423



What I had to do was cut down the clearance on the Lee die and the shell holder. The factory setup left about .135 of the case base unsized. The cases were NOT dropping into my chamber, they had to be pushed in.

I cut the shell holder down to about 0.060



Cut about .040 off the die base and ground the carbide down leaving a minimal amount of the factory bevel



The final sizing will get down to about the last .060 of the case base.



As usual, I sometimes don't know when to stop. I kept cutting the shell holder down til it got a bit too close to hold up and the lip blew out after 100 cases. Not to worry, I ordered 4 more and was able to do a tig job on the broken one good enough to do some cases until the others arrive.

I shoot a full sized 1911 springfield, an FN Hi Power and a Springfield 1911 Micro 40 compact. Reloading has gone fairly well once the charges were figured out. The micro needs a tad less than the bigger guns. Now that the cases are sized properly I look forward to about flawless function.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's awesome. I went down and tried drilling out a Lee sizing die to see if I could push a case through with the Lee Bullet sizer ram. NO GO
 

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yes, glock brass seems to be more flared at the base as you have found out. also, the redding thru die is an elegant solution.

however, from your pics, the bulged brass appears to be longer? im not sure if its just the pic angle or it truely is longer. iac, if it is longer, then i would be worried about it separating at that shiny ring. you should be able to see/feel that separation.

also, i would get another new shell holder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's one a them optical illusions, Handheld photography. They mic out at .840 as does all my winchester 40 brass. So then why does the book call for .850 ? My chambers mic out at .850. And ain't the bullet supposed to headspace of the case mouth? So is that .010 shortage an acceptable tolerance? I notice my firing pin strikes look light, but never seem to have any problem with ignition. That makes me wonder how far the firing pin travels upon hammer strike. When the back is flush with the firing pin stop, the striker is well behind the firing pin hole. So it can only travel, roughly, half the distance of the firing pin stop which is about .130 to .150 thou thick. Guessing .060 max travel. Maybe the .010 is within tolerance to make up for variations in mfg ? Don't suppose you'd wanna have a case mouth bearing against a chamber lip and a breech face slamming up against a barrel hood with a brass case that has absolutely not play. And a high primer !
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just came up from the reloading room with new enlightenment. It's a never ending quest to check recheck and triple check every possibilty making sure everyting is Otay!

I've got these reloads chambering about perfectly. As a fired round is extracted, it's visibly out of round. When it goes into the Lee sizing die the upper half of the case looks like it barely make contact with the die. The lower half takes a serious set, so much so that the carbide rubs the brass to a high gloss. Although the case now looks concentric to the naked eye, it still has to go through the flaring die and seating die, neither of which effect any further concentricity to the case mouth. At this point a bullet will NOT drop into my Springfield chambers without a significant shove. I set out to see why. So obviously on some tight match barrels, bullets coming right oout of the Lee bullet seating die will not chamber, especially in tuned guns with lightened springs. So the factory crimping die becomes a necessary step if you want flawless function on your reloads.

I blued up the case mouth of a loaded round and pushed it in the chamber to find it rubbing eccentrically around its mouth. The FCD brought it into exact concentricity and fine adjustment with blue showed full contact of the case mouth with the chamber lip.

At this point I'm feeling pretty good about my loads falling into tight specs.
 

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I have never heard a bad thing about the Lee Factory Crimp Die. I have just ordered my first reloading press and am trying to figure out what components I am going to want from the various manufacturers. Since I have both a .40 S&W and a 10mm, I will be loading in those calibers, they use the same dies. My 10mm is a Glock 20, so I expect that I may be seeing the same problem that you experienced. The way I understand it is, that Glock factory barrels do not have a fully supported chamber. They leave a bit of the case head unsupported which can cause shortened case life and bulging. Particularly in the really hot 10mm loads. Guys who shoot the 10mm Glock and who reload, often switch to an aftermarket barrel with a fully supported chamber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just got back from the range and blew off my last 10 mags of reloads that weren't fully sized. Had several FTRTFB. Hopefully that will be the last of that. Next visit I'll be shooting all fully sized cases. 40 cal case bulging is obvioulsly a real problem if someone designed a pushed through sizing press for just that trouble. I remember back in 90 when the round came out, looking at cross sections compared to the 10mm, 45 and 9mm. 40 was supposed to have a beefy base built to take heavy pressures generated by hot loads. Little did the glockanese know that we would start gaming and tricking out our barrels. I'm thinking the compactness of the cartridge didn't leave much room to vary loads up and down. My full size springer will not even cycle back enough to eject a shell if I drop down more than a disk or two on the Lee charger. If I go up a disk or two it'll flatten primers.

Right now I'm using HS6 with a .43 disk for my micro compact and a .49 disk for the full size and FN Hi Power and am getting good cycling and no primer flattening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Got a few extra Lee shell holders today and ground one down 40 thou to help size the brass down as far as possible. Grinding worked better than trying to cut with a carbide lathe cutter cause the holders are hardened and the heat weakend the lip of the first attempt noted on the right. But I DID salvage it temporarily with the tig. The factory holder on the left is quite beefy. The lee dies are another story. The carbide has a chamfer that is about 90 thou that disallows any sizing to take place. The die CAN be ground on the diamond wheel about 40 thou and still leave a slight chamfer, but the steel retaining sleeve loses its hold on the carbide. So I had to grind a slight external chamfer on the carbide and peen the steel over to retain the die insert. In the end I gained about 60 thou of sizing depth.
 

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Having read this post, I purchased a Redding G-Rx push thru sizing die,
and tried it out. I took some brass that measured out at .840, and then
mic'd them after the resize. The case sizes after sizing were: .842/ .841/
.844/ .843/ .841. It is clear that all case bulges were removed. It is also
clear that it takes some real pressure to move the cases through the die.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Are you using a Lee single stage press or a D shaped heavier duty press. As I mentioned briefly in a previous post, I drilled out a lee sizing die so a case could come out the top. The Lee sizing ram is too soft a metal and mushroomed. The Lee single stage press which I had temporarily screwed to the bench top pulled out. That made me wonder whether Redding beefed up there ram? They DID say the dies would fit any and all standard presses, but didn't mention if any press had the leverage it takes.
 

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I used my old RCBS Rockchucker bolted through the bench
with about 3.5" of wood depth. Also, I followed the directions
and applied a thin coat of Imperial to the die as well as the cases.
 
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