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hey all,

im interested in reloading, but know nothing about it.

could anyone help. id like to know what equipment/materials i would need, difficulty level etc.

thanks in advace,
robert
 

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I would start by asking some of the guys you shoot with - and find out, if they reload, what they use and how they like it. But like anything, some guys are sloppy - and some guys go by all the rules.

There are a lot of good books out there - general stuff - and stores like sportsman's warehouse, etc all carry them.

For pistols and rifles - the loader I prefer is Dillon. personally I have the 650 and I like it a lot - but there is nothing wrong with the other Dillon presses either. Picking a press - you need to consider volume, do you want automatic indexing, is the "powder check" station important to you, etc Dillon has a good website - but there are other loaders on the market as well - Lee, Hornady, RCBS, etc

Reloading for most handgun calibers will save you a significant amount of money - but the reason most of us do it - is we like shooting our own loads - and generally we can produce loads that are a lot more consistent than a lot of the factory ammo out there.
 

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We also load because of the knowledge. I've found out more about guns and shooting by reloading than by anything else (except shooting, I suppose). The first order of business is to get a reloading manual, preferably from the company that makes your preferred components.

I run a pretty simple setup, and I reload for 3 different cartridges right now. Two of them are rifle cartridges, and the third one is a rifle/handgun cartridge that I just started loading. Once you get the bulk of your tools, it starts to get cheaper. I built up my reloading stuff slowly, finding out what I need as I go along. I'd say the bare minimums are a simple press, the appropriate dies, calipers, and a scale (in addition to the manual). Other VERY handy things are reloading trays, a tumbler, a deburring tool, and a case trimmer. That's about the simplest set you'll want, and it can be thrown together for not a huge amount of money. You'll probably find other tools that work well for you and improve your reloading experience. As you start reloading different cartridges (which you will, once you get the hang of it), all you'll need is dies.

Welcome to the wonderful world of rolling your own.
 

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Robert:
I started in reloading to save a few bucks and winters tend to be long. I read & read & read. Started with a Lee Anniversary kit cost $65 new with everything you need to start reloading, of course I had to buy powder, bullets,primers,cases. Oh yeah and a die set too! That said, came to about $150, I ran off 200 shells went and shot them Great fun!!!!

To date I have 3 bullet presses (all Lees) 3 shotshell presses.
Most of my stuff is Lee. You can take advantage of their 2nds on the Lee web site I picked up a Lee 1000 progressive for half price with a full warranty on it! I bought some stuff thru Ebay as well!

Now then some folks dont like Lee, I do and one of my shooting buddies loves em too! They're relitavly inexpensive and work very well. I highly reccomend you purchase the Lee reloading book by Richard Lee, it's very informative and a easy read with lots of recipes.

A little somthing to be aware of, each time you mount a new press, takes about a week to get it to work right, for example when I setup the 1000 I disabled the primer sensor, had the devils own time using a up stroke to set the primers and so forth but I overcame the new method for that press and now can load say 100 shells in about 1 hour.

Is it worth it?? Hell Yeah!! Be happy to share tips as you go along.
Regards
 

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rsjr said:
could anyone help. id like to know what equipment/materials i would needrobert
You will need a press, reloading dies (caliber specific), powder scale, case trimmer, and some other tools as a minimum. I would recommend one of the kits offered by various manufacturers. I also use quite a bit of Lee equipment (2 progressive prsses and other tools), but don't recommend their powder scale. I use an RCBS 1010 and have found it very accurate.
The first press that I bought was an RCBS single stage along with some other equipment that I bought in a box at a yard sale for $10. That was many years ago and it served me well. I would recommend starting on a single stage as it will help you to learn each operation of the reloading process. Then move up to a progressive if you require it.
As others have said...READ!. Ther is a wealth of information on the net on reloading as well as many books. I use the Hornady reloading manual and highly recommend it..
 

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Glad you are going to give it a try. As far as brands go, I think Lee is good enough to get the job done for most folks. That said the fit and finish on the other brands is usally better. Most of my set up is RBCS. I bought the "bargain" entry set. It was about 140$ for the press, scale, book, and the basics. It was possible to reload with this, but very slow. I quickly added a powder measure, also RBCS, and works like I expect. I also have the RBCS hand primer gizmo, which works flawlessly. The prime rig on my press was tedious.

As for dies, I like the Hornady. Have them in both 32mag and 38/357.

I did get the Lee book, and learned most of what I know about reloading from it. He does Quite a bit of sales pitch, but there is a lot of load data. I got mine in the combo deal with the reloader press. I think I paid 20$ for both. Thought having an extra press for decapping/other would be usefull.

Having said all this, if I were looking to upgrade to a progressive press, the Hornady lock and load would be at the top of my list.

Edit, Here's the link to the lee site http://www.leeprecision.com/cgi/catalog ... ersaryPack
 

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I think it is a great hobby, and everyone is giving you sound advice.

You can start off inexpensively, until you know if you really enjoy the hobby. Also i find that the knowledge you gain, in understanding the aspects in balistics, head space , velocitys etc... are going to help you in maintaining your guns, and make you a more well rounded knowledgable gun owner.

Good luck in your new found intrest in this wonderful hobby. Just make sure that you exercise safety, and do your reloading by the book. Ask questions about anything you dont understand. Do not take anything for granted. We are all here to help, dont be afraid to ask. There are no stupid questions in this hobby.

I have been reloading for 25 years and i am still learning things, thats what makes it a life long hobby. And it is a nice feeling to be able to have this independence in making ammo for your guns. Very rewarding.

Good luck, and take care, Jack :D
 
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