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Going to start reloading for my 45. I can get the press ready to run from Lee for $125 (midwayusa) and be ready to run except for buying a tumbler.

Are these good presses for the money? I know the dillons are a better press, but are they worth the $300 more?

Just curious as to peoples experiences. I reload 12 Gauge for shooting skeet on a Mec 600 set up for auto-prime, so I have some experince with having to tweak finicky eqip. That being said, I have not had to adjust my Mec in 3000 shells, once I got the bugs worked out of it.
 

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The Lee was my first progressive reloader and I would continue saving for a different reloader. It was good for the price (well under $100 back then) but just did not hold up to moderate o heavy use. I had minor parts breakages and very poor primer feeding which I solved by hand seating all primers before sending them through the machine. I got more than my money out of it if you include being able to use the dies on later machines but still had to buy another machine at a later time. Look at getting a used machine, Dillon warrants the machine, not the owner, and a used machine with dies and often extras can be had for about half the price of new, maybe less if lucky. I don't think you can wear out one of these and even if you need to have it refurbished, Dillon will do so quite reasonably.
 

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I personally dont care for Lee equipment. I use RCBS, however Dillon is just as good. If it were me I would continue saving. :wink:
 

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Save up for a Dillon. Ive had some Lee products and you get what you pay for. Just last week I ordered some 9mm Lee dies,and sent them back 1 day later for an exchange to RCBS. I thought I'd save the $14.....what a mistake, nowhere near the quality of RCBS
 

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Big D - what was wrong with the dies? I use Lee dies and I think they are as well made as Hornady or RCBS. I honestly can't tell the difference in quality between them or the finished reloads.
 

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I didnt care for the finish of the dies, maybe Im just used to the look of the RCBS. The O-ring locking setup did not lock the die down as well as I would like. I really did like the idea of the powder through the expanding die and wish that more die makers would use this. I have used Lee load-alls for shotgun reloading and have retired them for MEC Grabbers. I still use the hand priming tool for all of my handgun reloading. One question though.... Why is the primer flipper round when all primers I know of shipped in square boxes :shock: I have spilled more primers trying to load that darn thing than I care to talk about.
 

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I've never used a Lee 1000 before, but I do reload .357 on a Lee Turret Press. Works great for me, but I only load a box or two at a sitting. Lots of people swear by big blue, so if you got the cash and that's what you want, go for it!

Bob
 

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Big Daddy,
the primer trays are round so there are no corners for the primers to get caught in and not flip. Most trays I've seen have been big enough to put the primer holders in them with out spilling. It is a trick to turn all the primers upright with out spilling them, someday I may learn it. I agree that the fit and finish of Lee dies may be less than that of other brands but I have found them to be very suitable for genral use. All my bulk ammo is done on them and I use thier crimpng die on several calibers too. It is not all that much more for RCBS and others so one should buy and use what they like and have cnfidence in.
 

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I wish someone would have told me how bad the Pro 1000's are before I bought my fourth one. I have 45 acp, 38 spl, 44 spl and now I just got a 9mm. The first 2 were the round powder chamber and the last2 have the square. You just have to pay attention to what's going on. A friend of mine says he blew up a pistol with loads from a Dillion. I will say one thing for Dillion, he sure has some beautiful ladies in his catalogs.
 

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been using the Dillon 550 number of years. couple small parts broke, called Dillon, had the part in couple days NO CHARGE...can't beat that....................
 

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Been using my lee presses for years. I will admit that there priming operation leades a lot to be desired. For a long time i have been priming with the RCBS hand held primer. I dont mind it so much, as it permits me with more time eye balling the brass. There are a number of times i see a flaw in the used brass that might have gotten by me if i didnt use the hand held primer. This inturn lead me to start checking my case length, before i prime. The rest of the press i think is decent, as far as quality. And i do like thier carbide dies. I have loaded thousands of rds with both. I do not have the pro 1000, i bought my first press before they started making them. I own one of thier Loadmasters. Also a single stage Lee Classic Cast, which i use for my Rifle brass. This is a very strong single stage press. 25 yrs ago, when i first got into reloading money was definetly a factor as to buying this equipment. At this moment in time all my equipment has paid for itself. As in time most likely any of the more expensive presses we are talking about will pay for themselves, reguarding thier owners. I am at the point in my life, where i would rather keep what i have and buy more guns, then to up grade my reloading presses. End result i now make ammo that is sufficent for my needs, i find i run out of supplys faster then my Lees can keep up with. My friends like my ammo, when i can spare it. I will say go with your gut feeling as to purchasing your new press. And dont let cost hinder you in making ones choice. Most likely what you buy is going to be with you for a long time. Especially once you are comfortable with the mechanics of the machine you purchase. I do believe it has more to do with the person behind the press, than the press itself. I dont know how many times i tried others reloads and after hearing of how much money they spent on thier equipment, finding out thier ammo was not dependable. As far as stove pipes, OAL, head spacing issues, feeding, continuity as far as powder issues. One rd mild, next rd hot. With the said reloads being of the same recipe. So most presses are up to the task, if thier operators are willing to do thier homework. Its a hobby that in time, most people get better at i think. Happy reloading and good luck with whatever Press you decide on. Take care, Jack
 

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Hi there;
I can't say much about the Lee Press, but I have the Dillon 650. I do like it a lot, and 1100 rounds an hour in 357 wasn't too much effort. I shoot several calibers, so the quick change heads are nice. It still takes 5 or 10 minutes to change over. It took a bit of getting used to like anything else, but a great reloader and a great company to deal with.
Good luck,
Mark
 

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I have two three Dillon presses - two Square deals and a 550 (they were given to me). I have two Lee Pro 1000's. The Dillons are great presses but I seem to use the Lees (9mm and .45ACP) more - maybe because I've had them longer. I have loaded many 10's of thousands of rounds of .45 on the one press and have no complaints. I continue to use it regularly.
I like the fact that I can load in 80 cases on the Lee at once and also find that changing/loading primers on to the machine is easier with the Lee. As to priming, if I keep the primer plunger clean and stay with Lee's recommendations about primers (Win. or CCI), I have no problems or, at least, very few.
Pete
 

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I have a Lee Pro 1000. I hated it I now have a dillon 650
the thing I hate most about it was the chain Driven Powder measure. I also had to manually place the primers as the unit would never place them correctly. I love my 650 and will not ever change now.
 

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Tantrum: "chain driven powder measure". I'm not familiar with that. Both my Lee presses drop powder when a lever is actuated on the upstroke at station two. I guess a chain would be less efficient but neither of mine has that feature. Go figure.
Pete
 

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:D I love my Lee turret press. I do prime with a Lee hand primer and use a Lee auto disk for the powder measure. I use a taper die as the last step for 9mm and 45ACP
Fourbits
 

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lee products are just fine. you will with a little learning curve load great ammo. that said, i subscribe to the buy once cry once theory, and will suggest saving for a dillon 550 with carbide dies. i have 2 dillon 550's, an rcbs turret and am getting a lee for cast bullet sizing.
 

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I own the Dillon SL 9000 shotgun loader and it is as good as it gets. The one thing you will here over and over is the Dillon customer service is second to none. You will not deal with a better company "period". You ask them for a part and it is on your door step in a few days free of charge no questions asked.
With all that said, I just purchased a Hornady lock n load AP for my metallic loading. There customer service is supposed to be in line with Dillon's. The price and the free bullets made me go the Hornady way. I will report back as soon as I get 1000 loads done on it. If it don't work out I will sale it and get the Dillon 650.
 

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Had Lee products turrent, then Poor 1000 oops (pro) Had Dillion Square Deal and 550 now have the Hornady projector can't beat the price, the quaility or techincal help. P.S. The case feeder is great and the Dillion can't touch it
 
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