Pistol World Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This may sound like a realy stupid question but, I was just wondering is there a such thing as to much gun oil? I have always been told that you should tke the oil put it on a cloth and rub the oil on your firearm, but when I do that it feels and looks like there is not enough oil on the gun. When I take the oil and aply it directly on the gun by spary it or just letting a few drops fall on it i feels and looks like it is to much oil. My question would be is what is the correct way to aply my gun oil to my firearms and how do I know when I have enough on the gun. Thanks for any help.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
318 Posts
If you are going to store a gun for some time it is better to have more oil. However if it is a gun you use more frequently all you need is the lightest film of oil. Oil does protect but it also attracts dust. I clean mine with Breakfree CLP, and also use this as my gun oil. Consequently when I am through cleaning I just wipe the gun down with a cloth. This seems to leave an appropriate amount of oil behind for protection.
I hope this helps. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
There is, but the manufacturer will give you good instructions on how much and where. I recently bought my first AR and was surprised at just how much oil is recommended to keep it running smoothly; just depends on the firearm and the climate conditions you live and shoot in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
What kind of gun is it?

Some guns run well with more oil, most seem to run well with very little. A SIG, for instance, only needs a bit; run a oil-soaked Q-Tip along the slide rails and contact surfaces (barrel lug, etc) and you're good to go. Glocks seem to need almost nothing.

Rev's right - oil, especially large amounts, seems to attract and retain dirt, unburned residue, and the other nasty stuff you're trying to keep out of the gun. Too much oil won't hurt, but you'll want to clean more often as well.

I use Slide-Glide on the rails and Tetra oil on the lockwork...the former is a grease and gets really nasty if there's too much, but is slick as snot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all your help. I have a Springfield XD 40 that is the gun I put to use the most. My others no seem to stay in the safe more then I shoot them now days. And I have a few long guns as well
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Check your owner's manual for the manufacturer's recommendation for points of lubrication on your XD. If you bought the gun used without a manual, one can be had from Springfield. If you're lubing a pivot point, a drop or two from the applicator should be sufficient. Otherwise, a modest amount applied with a cloth or Q-Tip is fine. If, after application, it looks like it's too much, then it probably is. Wipe off the excess.

Some people like to run their guns dry or almost so. I like a little lube on the friction points.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I agree with the "too much oil" thing. I use a syringe and small needle obtained from Tractor Supply Co (TSC) in their cattle dept. and pipe cleaners (Q-Tips shed too much). The syringe gets into small places and the oiled pipe cleaners for easy places like frame rails, etc. This is one man's opinion. Have a nice year.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top