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looking for a cc pistol. what do you think of the taurus pt145 milennium pro 45 acp? is it too heavy, does it cycle every time, is it reliable.
 

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I knew someone who had the 40cal a while back. Trigger pull was about 12lbs and travel was way long. Also takedown is not too straight forward if I remember right. He traded it, at a loss, for a XD-40. he's much happier.

Best of luck.
 

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I am not a fan of Taurus pistols and especially not in 45 ACP. Starting back with the PT45 they seem to have frequent problems with the frame cracking. When this happens the gun is no longer safe to fire and it can get costly shipping it to Taurus for replacement. I have heard of this happening with subsequent models too so it doesn't seem they have their act together yet. The most recent experience I've had with the Pro series was last summer when a customer came out to the range with one in 40 S&W. He had nothing but problems with it from failure to feed to stovepipes and a couple of failures to fire mixed in. I do not know anything about the condition of the gun, the person's cleaning habits, the age and amount of use of the gun, or anything else as the guy gave up after the third magazine and stomped off mumbling to himself. It seemed prudent to not approach him at that moment. I haven't seen him since. The ones I knowingly saw prior to that day seemed to work OK, at least I didn't notice any problems to that extent.
 

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Since you're looking for a concealed carry weapon, let's assume that when you need to use it, it MUST work.

A small frame DA revolver with a 2 or 3 inch barrel in .38 Spl or .357 Mag is a better deal. Save the autoloader for fun at the range, but when your life depends on it, take a wheelgun every time.
 

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Wwb is right about the wheelgun being more reliable. A .357 is also more versatile since it can shoot .38 or .357 magnums. If you don't want a revolver then the Springfield Armory XD is worth a look. It has a compact version too.
 

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I disagree with the idea of semi-autos not being the most reliable, with a minimal of care many of them can be as trustworthy as a revolver. The revolver will stand up to more abuse but any person who abuses their safety equipment should suffer the effects of Darwinism. At one time or another I have carried them all and another axiom of personal protection is to have a gun when you get into a gunfight. Semi-autos are much more comfortable to carry for the majority of people due to their flat shape which makes one more likely to carry it. Many also find it much easier to shoot a compact size auto than a small framed revolver due to grip shape/size and trigger pull. This is for compact versions of standard pistols such as the XDSC and Glock, not the true sub-guns like a Kel-Tec, Bersa, Seecamp or others. This issue really has no "best" answer, one must make as informed decision as they can make based upon their research, expectations, and possibly experience of themselves and others. Glock, the Springfield XD (there isn't a 45 ACP compact version yet but it does come in compact 9mm and 40 S&W), SIG, S&W, Ruger, CZ, and a host of others have proven themselves dependable in everyday use. For the money of a new Millinium one could find a used Glock, S&W, maybe a SIG, or a new Ruger all of which have a very good track record for dependibility.
 

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UD....

All true, but there are far too many people carrying an auto when they should be carrying a wheelgun. You never know on a forum like this, just how much of a "gun person" somebody is, so you need to approach everything from the conservative side.

Even the best auto can have a failure to fire, a stovepipe, or a failure to feed; and Murphy's law says it'll happen when you least need it. If you have to shoot an auto from a contorted position (as in diving for cover as you shoot), it may well have a "limp wrist" failure. If you've trained enough so that "tap-rack" is an automatic response, and will happen even under times of great stress, then you could carry an autoloader.

A DA wheelgun is just a whole lot simpler.... and if there's a failure to fire for any reason, just pull the trigger again - not an option with an auto.

Different strokes for different folks; I'm very familiar with many varieties of firearm - to the point where I could be considered competent with an autoloader, but I'll take a quality DA revolver every time. However, I'll temper my previous response this way..... "if you are not willing to practice, practice, practice, and then practice some more, an auto is not for you."

How's that?
 

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I'd have to ammend that to, "if you are not willing to practice, practice, practice, and then practice some more, a gun is not for you".
I feel the conservative, responsible track is to point out the pros and cons of both styles and let the carrier decide what is best for them. One does not need to be a "gun person" to keep a semi-auto in good running condition, just a conscientious one. Kind of the person you want carrying a gun around.
Limp wristing is a much less common occurance than it used to be, at least with modern striker and DA pistols. I can't remember the last time I've seen that happen with a Glock, Smith, SIG, Springfield XD, or others of that type. The grip needed to fire it I believe pretty mostly prevents that from happening. I have gone as far as holding it balanced in the web of my thumb with no fingers and only the pressure on the trigger all that kept the gun from falling. It still fired and fed. Stoppages with an auto are usually simple and quick to fix, not much longer than replacing a magazine. Revolvers have their problems too and any of them pretty much necessitate the transition to another gun. Reloading is also much longer and more involved with the carrying of extra rounds being a little more of a problem with speedloaders.
I agree with different strokes for different folks and believe the carrier should be given enough information to make their own choice. Personally, I have carried revolvers in the past but in my eyes they cannot hold a candle to the comfort, shootability, and capacity of a semi-auto though some find otherwise.
 
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