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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


Talk about fun, I believe this may be it in metallic form!

I was wondering if anyone has seen, and is feeling any interest in, the new pistol being manufactured and released in 2011 to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of John M. Browning's design of the Model 1911 that has been so popular for only the past century. It is known as the 1911-22-A1.

I've watched a video or two, one featuring a Browning design engineer at the 2011 Shot Show taking down the pistol, that seem to give strong indication that the pistol design is genuinely based upon original Browning specifications. In spite of the fact that the pistol is a scaled-down (80%) replica of the standard 1911-A1 .45 ACP version, I was surprised to see that pistol is taken down exactly like my 1911s. It is not based upon a 1911 conversion unit, and the only difference apparent to me, per the video, is the modification of the recoil system to include a recoil buffer rod component, that is typically optional in the .45 ACP version.

I've called around to many of the gun shops in my area and thus far no one has one in stock for me to handle and inspect. It would appear that authorized Browning dealers will be the first to take shipment and they will be priced at $500-525, in spite of an MSRP of $600. I've got my name on the top of several lists to get a call when first shipments arrive.

Although it is not a target pistol, nor is it of standard 1911 size, it is a cheap-to-shoot plinker (.22 LR) with a very familiar feel, and it's made in the USA by a company with an impeccable reputation. Furthermore, assuming that Browning sticks to its present plan to make this a limited production pistol, I believe that this gun has great potential to be a collectible of the future.

Your thoughts and/or discussion?
 

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Re: New for 2011 ... The Browning Model 1911 Chambered in .2

It may well be collectable some years down the road, but if that's your intent, you had best not shoot it..... where's the fun in that?

If you already have a 1911, $200 will buy you a Ciener .22 conversion for it.... a cheap way to get a .22 cal 1911.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Re: New for 2011 ... The Browning Model 1911 Chambered in .2

wwb said:
It may well be collectable some years down the road, but if that's your intent, you had best not shoot it..... where's the fun in that?
Clearly, you speak the truth! I agree that the best way to get the maximum return is to keep the gun unfired, and I further agree wholeheartedly that there is no fun in not firing a gun that was made to be shot. Where's the fun in that indeed?

For that reason, I would plan to fire it and enjoy the gun as much as I could. But I also am really fussy about taking care of my guns. My Browning purchases over the years, limited production and otherwise, have proven to give great return if taken care of during my enjoyment of them. In my opinion, my Browning purchases over the years have yielded a great return in either appraisal value or resale return, if I've sold or traded them.

Here's an example of what I mean. Price a "like new" Browning B-78 (.22-250) these days ... I paid $362.50 for mine ANIB in the mid-80's (unfortunately traded it on a V. Bernardelli, 20-gauge Brescia that is now gone as well), or a Browning B-92 (.44 Mag) ANIB that I paid $225 for in 1988, or the record-setter which has to be the used, but minty, Browning B-SS 20-gauge SxS that I got for $545 in 1992 ... they've tripled in value in less than 20 years. This is my point ... all of them were used and shot - still are, but are in excellent condition, and were of limited production. Look what they are valued at today.

My thinking is this ... there's something about Browning's limited production that Browning does right. I might be crazy, but this Browning 1911-22-A1 is giving me the same vibes, but I have to see it and feel it first, before I decide. Besides, it's the 100th Year Commemorative honoring the man who designed the Model 1911. Few will argue that John M. Browning is unquestionably the greatest, most prolific gun designer in history - American or otherwise.
 

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Re: New for 2011 ... The Browning Model 1911 Chambered in .2

Not only Brownings.... any quality firearm, even though used, will appreciate in value if cared for.

If you look at inflation adjusted dollars, though, you'll find that most guns (there are a few exceptions) are really just holding a constant value. That ain't all bad, though.... basically you get to use it for free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Re: New for 2011 ... The Browning Model 1911 Chambered in .2

I think I may be falling out of love with the idea of getting one of these. I just read the specs for these in a new Browning Catalog ... the slides are machined aluminum. Not very endearing!
 
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