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bought this from a fellow collector who said this odd threaded barrel was on iy when he bought it,and replaced it with a original .32 acp barrel

i got the threaded barrel and some ammo for it in the purchase as well,any ideas as whats up with the threaded barrel and odd necked ammo?







 

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The second casing looks like a 7.65x21 cartridge otherwise known as the .30 Luger (not to be confused with the .30 Mauser, 7.63x25). I'm guessing that a conversion barrel was made for it at some point in time, possibly to make use of a supply of ammo more locally available than .32 ACP. The threaded portion may be for a silencer, or it could merely be a weight used for proper functioning with the ammo and blow back operation of the gun, or it could be used as a bushing to keep the barrel centered; I really don't have the foggiest idea but those would be (and are) my best guesses. My knowledge of the Ruby pistol is pretty minute, all I really know is that they were generally issued to secondary troops and were made in Spain for the most part. The several manufacturers did not follow design specs closely either; it is not uncommon for parts made by one company to not fit another's gun at all. I think they were meant to be a cheaper variation of the Browning 1903 but am not sure where I heard that or if it was even regarding this gun. I hope some of this is of a little help and not a wrong direction.
 

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Ruby is actually a type of pistol-a simplified version of the 1903 Browning as stated. Made in Spain , used by France in WWI, but many were used after the war by other countries in Europe and French troops in the far east and North Africa.
Some were used in WWII, and much later.
The ones that worked evidently work just fine-Some were still in use by the Viet Cong.
Could the odd round be a Tokarev?

Keep all the parts together, along with your bill of sale or whatever paperwork you have, and keep the pistol as you found it (Don't chrome plate it, etc.)
I don't know what you have, but someone might.
They have been used around the world since 1916.

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