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Hello Everyone,

I thought I would ask for some opinions, I've been thinking over this problem for some time now and I'm pretty much stumped with only one exception, but on a scale I rank the solution fairly low.

I have a couple of older pistols and revolvers that have some fairly deep vertical cancer to them, the autos are not such a big problem as it's just a matter of removing enough material and then re-engraving but the revolvers are entirely another matter as I can't just remove material from cylinders and barrels without weakening the integrity of some already pretty old pieces.

I'm fairly certain that no new metal can be welded to the barrels or cylinders to build up to something workable as I could on slides or receivers, so I was wondering if any of the "liquid metal" type epoxy products would actually do the job.
I experimented with a few compounds I was able to find at the ACE store and was able to get them to stick and it was easily workable both before and after they cured but not knowing what I was in fact doing, I blasted it away after I finished experimenting with it.

If I can actually utilize this process or something similar I will ceramic finish the pieces, so I'm not overly concerned with the difference in materials taking to the finish.

Any advise would be appreciated, even if its just to say I must have fallen on my head... I would rather error on the side of caution.

Thanks for reading and a Very Merry Christmas to All.
Mdark
 

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JB weld and gun coat is really your only option.

well you could build up the pitts with copper plating and then do the finish of your choice but it will cost more than the pistols and somone that knows what they are doing as to not build up copper in the barrel, action ect.
 

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Your problem is a challenge. I hav done a few gun things that are considered impractical or impossible. Starting with your idea as a lost cause, may not work, etc. I have used and would experiment with the iron based fillers offered for machinery repairs. Some are pretty strong and can be tapped to take a thread for example. There may be better sources but I see them at the big auto parts stores.

I would first read the directions on the package and try those that look most applicable. "Try" in this case would be to apply it to a steel surface, such as a file. Try to shape, smooth, polish it to simulate a surface you would want on a gun. Then figure how you will finish it. You mention ceramic finish, if such a finish can be applied at room temp it could put you on the road to success. I doubt you will find any of the plastic steel sort of products that will endure elevated temperatures.
 

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I know that this is an old thread, but the problem is of such a generally applicable nature (who hasn't come across a really nice gun - except for the bad pitting - and wondered, can I fix it up?) that I figured I'd throw in my two cents worth:

Some comments on pitting in general:
Pitting not only reduces the minimum wall thickness of the structure (in this case, a cylinder or gun barrel) in the obvious manner, it also acts to concentrate stress at the pit. Sometimes called a "stress riser", a sharp bottom pit of sufficient depth can actually multiply stress at the pit by a factor of up to 3 times. If you have a gun with bad pitting and you want to keep on using that gun, then I'd recommend that you fair out the pit so that it is more of a round bottom depression (recommend a 4 to 1 taper). This is the accepted procedure for non-rejectable pits in pressure vessels in the Navy. Otherwise you need to weld it up then stress relieve the weld repaired item.

Repairing a pit with ANY body-filler type preparation, regardless of what else is in the epoxy mix, is only a cosmetic fix. It cannot be regarded as a safe repair of a damaged pressure structure under any circumstances. Also, if the pit has not been faired-out properly then the stress concentration still exists. Worse, if you then sell the firearm without telling the buyer of the true condition of the gun and someone gets hurt..... guess who is libel?

One more thing to consider: some forms of corrosion also involve a type of corrosion called "intergranular corrosion" that basically amounts to de-alloying. In the case of high-carbon steel (note that all steel is an alloy of one sort or another), the process is called "carbon precipitation" and can microscopically impact the strength and integrity of the steel. So if you've got some bad corrosion, mabey you need to really think about the safety aspects....... Your decision. If you think it looks usable, then I say: more power to ya. Good Luck.
 
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