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My son says the ABC's does not have recipes for PISTOLS. Did I buy the wrong book?

Ive been reloading shotshells, and now my son and I have a joint effort to reload some .357 in 180 grain.

We have Small Pistol Magnum Primers, fired brass (not cleaned) and what we really need is a recipe.

I prefer a slow burning powder, and I don't care if it is a dirty powder.

We are starting out using the hand tools from the Lee Loader, with the intention of buying a good quality press in the future.

Is there an online site with recipes?

Where should we buy bullets. We aren't doing anything like MATCH loads, so....

Thanks! :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:

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Check out www.hodgdon.com and go to their DATA section. This is online data from their pressure lab for rifle, pistol and shotshell.

Generally speaking the H-110 and WW 296 work well with 180 grain bullets. Data will vary slighty with bullet manufacturers.

What type of 180's are you looking at? Jacketed or cast. What manufacturer? This will help with regards to appropriate data.

Thanks
Todd
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Todd.

What type of 180's are you looking at? Jacketed or cast. What manufacturer? This will help with regards to appropriate data."----Todd
Todd, I think initially, we just want Cheap to start with.

We don't really need jacketed or even HP.

I think it must be CAST that we are looking for, right? Is that the simplest?

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180 gr is a fairly heavy bullet for a 357 or 38 and that extra lead only adds to the cost. The most common bullet weight would probably be the 158 gr bullets and they should be much cheaper due to availability and amount of material. In some areas, the 140 gr bullets used by Cowboy Action Shooters are available and they are often the cheapest around. These are all cast lead bullets which are the easiest to load in my opinion. If you already have 180 gr bullets, by all means use them but look at alternatives if "cheap" is desired.
I believe the "ABC's" books are geared more toward the basic "how to" and set up rather than actually listing loads. There may be a handful of the most common loads for a few of the most common cartridges but not much else. Your best bet would be to try the websites of the powder and/or bullet manufacturer you plan on using or is common in you area. One can also find these where you are buying components too, for the most part. If using a lead bullet, you may find the best prices on locally cast bullets in which case there will likely be no reloading info available. Just follow the powder data for a similar weight and design bullet (158 gr lead semi-wadcutter for example) and you should be OK.
As for powders, I often use what I have on hand for my shotguns as that keeps things simple. Fortunately, that works out quite well. If I find it cheap enough, I will buy "pistol" powders and have found they all work well too. I guess with cast bullets in the 357 mag I use the most of Alliant's Unique and Herco. Winchester WSF and 231 frequent my bench as does Hodgdon Universal, Titegroup, and Clays.
In the 38 Spl the above are often used as well as Alliant Bullseye, Power Pistol, and Red Dot plus Hodgdon HP-38 and HS-6. There are a number of suitable powders for these cartridges and I personally recommend going with what is the least expensive and most readily available.
The magnum primers are most often not needed even for the 357 mag. The only time I feel the need for them is when using H-110/Win 296 powders. The use of these primers with some of the other powders mentioned can cause sharp rises in pressures which is not desirable.
I personally like quicker burning powders as they use less powder and are often "bulkier" which helps one spot an over or under charge easier. Some also believe the bulkier powders lessen the odds of a detonation in the chamber but I am not totally convinced of that though I lean further that way than not.
 

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You need to get a Speer manual at min, most reloaders have Hornady and Sierra also. Nothing wrong with the independents, its that these bullet mfg. do a lot of R&D.
My wife and I shoot the 38/357 in 4" revolvers. She favours 125g lead lrn for target, packs 110g jfp for defense. I load the 158g jhp for home defence, and also shoot the 125 lrn for all around. We developed our loads from manuals, forums, and range talk, or bs.
Jim
 

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I have worked out some good 38 special and 357 mag loads using Alliant Red Dot and Unique powders. If you are interested, send me a private message and I will give you what I have.
 

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Although I have several load manuals (Hornady, Speer, Lyman ...), one of the handiest little books I've ever come across is one like this ...



These Loadbook USA manuals (for most all calibers) are available from many sources and MidwayUSA sells them presently for $6.99. They are a compilation of loads by various bullet manufacturers/types/sizes and powder manufactures ... all in one book per calibers. I've got them for .44 Mag, 38 Special, 9mm Luger, 45 ACP, .30-06 Springfield, and .222 Remington. Manufacturer manuals (eg. Speer's manual) or just a simple phone call to the bullet/powder manufacturer's customer service number is easy confirmation if required.
 

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I do more rifle relaoding than handgun, but I like this one as a really good explaination of all the hows and whys. It also has a large number of recipes for cast bullet loads along with a variety of other components.



It will be nice to have on hand as you start reloading for other calibers, rifles, etc. :D
 
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