Pistol World Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For some years now I have had in my posession an original 1858 Mew Model Remington .44. My question is should I restore it or leave it alone?

Missing from the gun are grips,trigger, trigger guard, and main spring. The finish is in rough shape the bluing or what ever was used at the time is all but missing. The wheel and barrel are in great shape; the barrell looks as if it were rifled yesterday and the the wheel was once nickle plated.

I would attach a photo, but not sure how that is done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
640 Posts
I faced a similar situation myself a while back with a Colt 1855 revolving shotgun. I ended up having the gun appraised "as is" and compared it to the value if "restored" or "renovated". I ended up restoring the gun to original condition as the cost to do so was not appreciably different (the difference was in the cost of bluing/case finishing in the style of the period versus modern bluing) though the final value was markedly so (nearly 3x the difference). I ended up with a beautiful and functional firearm that is a real conversation piece.
I would suggest having the gun appraised in the event there is any unusual collector features present, get an estimate on what needs to be done and the price of both restored to original or renovated to "modern", and the final value of either choice. Then decide on what you want to end up with and/or want to afford. I see nothing wrong in bringing an old but unusable firearm to usable condition with modern materials if that is what one wants to do. I only chose to go my direction as the final price difference between the two was not all that great when one compared it to the value of the final piece. If the final value between the two finishes would have been close, I very well might have gone with a modern bluing job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Uglydog,

Thanks for the information; I had considered your suggestions some years ago and thought it best to leave the gun alone until now. Perhaps it would be best to have it appraised, although my thoughts are I would not see any value above a couple hundred dollars.

I think you are correct in your thinking the gun would make great conversation piece if left for display...I know the story behind the gun and how it ended up in my possession is always great story to tell.

One question, in order to have the gun re-blued professsionally would the process remove serial numbers and other identifying marks?

Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
640 Posts
Bluing in and of itself will not "remove" markings but it may cause them to become a little less distinct. More likely, buffing and polishing the metal to accept the bluing will more than likely cause some fading of numbers and markings. Someone knowledgeable in restorations should be able to reproduce those numbers and marking close to or exactly as original. A modern restoration can restamp those numbers with modern block too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
From the shape you describe your gun to be in, I don't think it would hurt its value to restore it. You might check with Dixie gun works in Tennessee or Numerich gun parts in New York.
There are several firms that can restore your pistol to like new cond., but they are very expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Your gun as you describe it would be valued little, as a 'parts gun'. However, it is of type that can be made complete at reasonable cost. Original parts such as trigger guard and grips can be found. Reproduction parts are also available but usually will have to be fitted by a person with the necessary skill. Value of the gun is enhanced by making it complete and functional, probably a bit more if the replaced parts are original to its type. Rough numbers of maybe $400 to make it complete will increase its present value to maybe twice that. Those steps would be required if you intend to go to a restoration to like new will likely put you in the couple thousand range. Having it reblued after making it complete can run from a hundred or so to several hundred depending on who, how, etc and might make it look better but not increase its value appreciably.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
Re: re: Restoration or Preservation?

uglydog said:
I faced a similar situation myself a while back with a Colt 1855 revolving shotgun. I ended up having the gun appraised "as is" and compared it to the value if "restored" or "renovated". I ended up restoring the gun to original condition as the cost to do so was not appreciably different (the difference was in the cost of bluing/case finishing in the style of the period versus modern bluing) though the final value was markedly so (nearly 3x the difference). I ended up with a beautiful and functional firearm that is a real conversation piece.
I would suggest having the gun appraised in the event there is any unusual collector features present, get an estimate on what needs to be done and the price of both restored to original or renovated to "modern", and the final value of either choice. Then decide on what you want to end up with and/or want to afford. I see nothing wrong in bringing an old but unusable firearm to usable condition with modern materials if that is what one wants to do. I only chose to go my direction as the final price difference between the two was not all that great when one compared it to the value of the final piece. If the final value between the two finishes would have been close, I very well might have gone with a modern bluing job.
That is solid advice... understand what you have before you do anything, then decide what to do based on what you want to of the firearm and what you can afford.

Well expressed Ugly Dog
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top