Pistol World Forums banner
21 - 37 of 37 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Dry firing any rimfire cartridge is not a good idea - most gun shops will not let you dry fire a .22 - it may cause damage to the hammer, etc. So I would not dry fire it unless I had some snap caps.

At one of the gun shows in my area - I picked up a dozen or so .22 snap caps ( little red plastic ones ) for under $5. So I just load them in the cylinder and dry fire my .22's with them in there. I think it's a better idea and cheap insurance.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
640 Posts
The plastic snap caps work quite well for rimfires, at least as well as they do for centerfires. The whole idea is to give the firing pin something to strike against and dissapate the energy derived from the whole firing process; to do so without something in the chamber is akin to "firing" a bow without an arrow, eventually the bow will break. If it is too onerous to get the smnap caps, using a spent case will do for a few snaps then the case will need to be turned to put a new part of the rim under the hammer. If too many shots are taken without doing this, the firing pin will eventually push the rim deep enough to make it essentually an empty chamber. The rim may even become pierced which would further stress the pin as it catches on the edges.
As for the original poster, knocking off the attitude and showing some respect would go a long ways towards gaining the respect you feel you deserve. I find it difficult to believe you know as much as you think you do based on the questions you've raised and response to answers posted in return. Much of your descriptions of yourself (as well as your tone and nature of talking) are concerning to me as they strike a resemblance to other juveniles who have "made the news" lately in places like Red Lak, MN and Columbine, CO to name a couple. For that reason, I find it not worth my while to respond further to his posts as I do not wish to become involved with him if something untoward should occur.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Snap caps. Gotcha.

I do not feel such precautions are necessary- but then you do. I won't force you to like me. Or respect me. Or trust me.

I also have another question.

Is it possible to get trigger work on my revolver? The draw isn't too bad, but the weight is too heavy and it's been messing with my placement. Tell me if you need a picture.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
It may be possible but I don't know about the less common revolvers like yours. A spring could probably be replaced with a lighter one but I don't know about availability or even the mechanics of the gun. Ask a gunsmith if you can. You will also probably have to have your mother take the gun for the trigger job. Keep that in mind.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
With a centerfire, if the hammer is dropped on an empty chamber, the firing pin hits nothing. Opinions vary on if its harmfull or not. But with a rimfire, since the firing pin is at the edge of the chamber rather than the middle, the firing pin can impact that part of the breech face where the cartridge rim would otherwise be at. The snap caps just give the firing pin something to hit.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Re: re: Revolver Dryfire

tenmilli-master said:
Snap caps. Gotcha.
One of the really good things about snap caps is that they are typically brightly colored; red is very common. Having bright red snap caps in a gun makes it WAY easier to tell what is in it. Using spent casings increases the possibility of error, and the last thing anyone wants is a negligent discharge.

I've been a shooter for a really long time now; something more than 3x your current age. I still have a lot to learn, but the one single thing I can tell you with certainty is that no matter how much time you spend around guns, you still have to be completely safety-conscious all the time, and never play around. Bad things tend to happen otherwise. This is why I would suggest never doing things like "spinning" and other hollywood nonsense with a real gun.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Agreed, but then there is a certain amout of reality in that hollywood nonsense. Besides, what's so bad about working on a quick-draw? That's a sort of thing I'd find in handy if I were carrying and had to "present arms".

And sometimes what i do (although it skews the balance) is completely remove the cylinder. Then I know that there's no chance of misfire.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Quick draw is something that I do not know much about, so I didn't mention it specifically. Google Ed McGivern, if you don't already know about him.

The spinning thing violates the rule about always pointing in a safe direction. I don't know of a range that wouldn't escort someone off the property for doing that.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Instead of me trying to tell you how to live your life, I will simply tell you that I NEVER break ANY of the basic rules of firearms safety, and none of my many friends I shoot with do either.

If I had a desire to spin a gun or other stuff like that, I would use a replica/fake gun. I just don't play with real firearms. But that's just me.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
To me it's the rationale in cases. Let's take the Assault Weapons Ban for example. 10 round magazines, what's the rationale behind that? Is it simply impossible to kill somebody with just 10 rounds of ammunition, or are criminals not likely to commit a crime with such a limited amount? If that's the case why do so many people still use revolvers?
 
21 - 37 of 37 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top