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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anybody using this forum know when the rosewood grips were discontinued I used to find them in the Shotgun News and at the Tulsa gunshow but havent seen any in years except for a set of diamond checkered ones on ebay with a lot of wear. It had to be in the early eighties, but would like to know. Thanks
 

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Hello Old Dude
I have Pair of the Target style with silver washers on the back, yet they still have the Oval Football dished Part. I have always been told thet the cut out for speed loaders occured in 1976 so they are before that. I recently came across a set of-N-Sq. Targets that are Rosewood smooth cariety and these are the first I have seen in the Larger-N-frame configuration. I have Two pairs similar to them but they are for the smaller-K-Frame sq. butt configuration. These also have the later silver washers but still date before 1976 with the older style reliefs..I would say all the rosewoods I have seen have been made before 1976. Here is thoe rosewoods I spoke of on my Model 27-N-Frame revolver..I hope this helps, Hammerdown




 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info Hammerdown I found most of mine in the early eighties I have several sets split between smooth like the beautiful set on your smith and checkered although none of the checkered ones have the diamond anround the screw head I always wondered when they quit the diamond around the screw I see the new grips have gone back to this practice, I have run across a lot of Sile grips with the S&W button put in and called factory but they never had the disks on the back again thanks for the info.
 

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according to the "standard catalog of S&W" 3rd ed, it appears that in ~1975 is when the Goncalo Alves became the standard for the oversized grips.

it also states that by the 1990s plastic and laminated was the standard grips.

you will still find them, but i usuall dont see people advertising them. usually they are in a box with other grips.

the catalog also give some prices for those RR grips.

K frame target style = $ 40.00 for "good" condition
N frame target style = $ 75.00 for "good" condition.

there are other values depending on the condtioin.

if you are going to collect S&Ws, you should give the book a once over. even the 2nd ed itsnt hat bad, but the 3rd has COLOR photos.
 

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toyrfun said:
according to the "standard catalog of S&W" 3rd ed, it appears that in ~1975 is when the Goncalo Alves became the standard for the oversized grips.

it also states that by the 1990s plastic and laminated was the standard grips.

you will still find them, but i usuall dont see people advertising them. usually they are in a box with other grips.

the catalog also give some prices for those RR grips.

K frame target style = $ 40.00 for "good" condition
N frame target style = $ 75.00 for "good" condition.

there are other values depending on the condtioin.

if you are going to collect S&Ws, you should give the book a once over. even the 2nd ed itsnt hat bad, but the 3rd has COLOR photos.







Hello toyrfun

I have and use the Three Books Entitled "The standard Catalog of S&W's". They are about the best out there, but often fall short on current market values that can change depending on Geographical location. Now for a few grips facts. In 1976 Roy Jinks who is now the factory historian was then running the service department. After much prompting from law enforcement agencies. He re-designed the larger Target style grips which previously had the Oval foot ball shaped relief, to now have the Crescent shaped upper Portion to allow the use of Speed loaders as the Older style prevented this, so all Grips made after 1976 span will have the crescent shape speed loader cut out. The wood {Gancalo-Alves} is an exotic Brazilian Rosewood. S&W started using it back around The very early 1950's time Span, as the Previous used Local wood , which was English Circassian Walnut. Post War Period made the Exotic English Circassian Walnut hard to find as the Tree's were becoming Extinct and very expensive to Purchase, so S&W found Gancalo-Alves The Exotic Brazilian Rosewood as a replacement.





The Original English Walnut showed to have Black streaks through it which gave excellent Grain definition and made it desirable, but The Goncalo-Alves also exhibited High grain definition. It can show to have a Light Blonde Color, to a deep Purple color in nature with a Lot of grain showing down to very Little grain definition with wide ranges in color or grain in all examples of it. In or around 1990-1991 S&W stopped production of all their wood grips. They Then switched over to laminated wood grips, and re-named the Company they owned to "The S&W Grip Corp." These grips will have a Three leaf clover Ink stamp on the rear of them. That company fell to The way side as Employees bought and owned it that were going to be laid off at S&W due to hard times, and consumer demand for laminated grips was Not desirable. The Fallen S&W Grip Corp, was then sold off to Altomont Grip Corp. who resumed production of S&W Grips along with grips for other manufacturers Like Ruger, Colt and such. The current market on Factory wood S&W Grips is strong and very High with an average of $45.00-$95.00 for the K-Sq. Grip frame target grips and an average of $75.00-$150.00 for the Larger-N-Sq. Frame Target Grips respectively in my Neck of the woods. I would Buy a truck load of them at the price Outlined in the Current S&W Standard Catalog. if you want a real Eye Opener, Just watch and follow up on what they are going for and being sold at on Flea-Bay... :D Hammerdown
 

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Kurt,

Your post seems to imply that Goncalo alves is a rosewood. Although it is often compared to rosewood because of the grain it is not in the rosewood genus family (Dalbergia). As you point out, S&W utilized Goncalo alves as their standard wood for target grips following the changes that were implemented by Roy, however, rosewood stocks were still available for both exhibition (smooth) target & smooth magna style. The older rosewood stocks that we see, especially the coke bottle style, were Brazilian Rosewood while the latest issued ones appear to be Indian Rosewood. I always wondered if during coke bottle style era '56-'67 if rosewood stock were a special order or if they were merely randomly selected at the factory.

Goncalo alves is a hardwood (from the Brazilian Portuguese name, gonçalo-alves). It is sometimes referred to as zebrawood or tigerwood — names that underscore the wood’s often dramatic, contrasting color scheme, that some compare to rosewood.

While the sapwood is very light in color, the heartwood is a sombre brown, with dark streaks that give it a unique look. The wood’s color deepens with exposure and age and even the plainer-looking wood has a natural luster.

Two species are usually listed as sources for gonçalo alves: Astronium fraxinifolium and Astronium graveolens, although other species in the genus may yield similar wood; the amount of striping that is present may vary. All trees grow in neotropical forests; Brazil is a major exporter of these woods.

All genuine rosewoods belong to the genus Dalbergia. The pre-eminent rosewood appreciated in the western world is the wood of Dalbergia ***** which is now a CITES-listed endangered species. It is best known as Brazilian Rosewood, but also as "Rio Rosewood" or "Bahia Rosewood." This wood has a strong sweet smell, which persists over the years, explaining the name "rosewood".

Another classic rosewood is that yielded by Dalbergia latifolia known as (East) Indian Rosewood or Sonokeling. Not all species in the large genus Dalbergia yield rosewoods; only about a dozen species do. They can be found in tropical America, Southeast Asia, and Madagascar.
 
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