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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New trooper here...I have reloaded match rifle rounds for years but am just getting started with pistol reloads. I need advice with seating primers for the 357 mag and my fantastically accurate 9mm Browning Highpower.

Primer guide:

I find that none of the primer guides in my Lee priming tool kit for rifles (thought they would work on pistols) fit the primer hole in the 357 or 9mm pocket...is it because I need another priming tool for pistols...if so please recommend a good one. If I can buy the guide part seperate and use it in the Lee priming tool please let me know.

Crimping:

My old 357 mag die set instructions says not to crimp the 9mm or 45...they are rimless for auto feed...I have both 357 and 9mm brass that definately have a rim...do you fellows crimp these rounds or is it necessary...

Case neck expander:

My die set has a neck expander that opens the neck a bit to make it easier to seat the bullet...I like the feature but could one use the old cricket deburring tool to the same advantage?

New brass:

Do you full size new brass (Remington). And, every case I've measured so far is within the trim to length figure in the reloaders manual...should I measure them all or is the manufactutrer trustworthy...and
do you reem the flash hole on new brass?

"To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas
which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical."
-- Thomas Jefferson

I'd appreciate any advice...

seatime
 

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The 357 mag and the 9mm Parabellum use small pistol primers which should be the same diameter as small rifle. The difference is the pistol primer is slightly shorter than the rifle and the cup is a bit thinner as it does not have to contain as high of pressure as in a rifle.
Its been a long time since I used a Lee priming tool and can't remember what it even looks like let alone what it has for pieces. If you have the correct ram and shell holder I would think there would be no problems. I am at a loss for ideas.

If your 9mm has a rim then you don't have 9mm Parabellum/Luger brass. This should have no rim, or at least no rim which extends beyond the case head.
I typically don't crimp any cartridges designed for a semi-auto pistol as they headspace on the case mouth. A roll crimp which is typically found on pistol dies may cause the cartridge to seat too deeply and one could have issues with ignition, pressures, and/or extraction. One can crimp these cartridges but you would have to buy a taper crimp die which would then allow the case mouth to headspace properly. I do this with some of my 40 S&W ammo as I use it in a sub-compact pistol which is picky on reloads. Normal, without crimp, loads sometimes have the bullet set back from recoil and that messes up the feed ramp geometry. Crimping these bullets allow for proper feeding and operation.

I roll crimp all my 357 mag ammo as it allows for better ignition of slow burning powders. this is especially true when using lighter weight bullets and/or slow powders.

I doubt a deburring tool would work adequately, it takes a bit of force to get the brass to expand. Besides, this operation is combined with depriming the case so it really doesn't pay to try removing this step.

I full length resize all new brass, it may meet specs for length but maybe not diameter. There could also be irregularities in the brass diameter and resizing can help rectify these issues. For semi-auto pistols this is especially important as they can be much more finicky regarding ammo than any revolver.

I am kind of shooting from the hip here, I generally check my resource materials before replying to make sure I am writing the correct info. I am not at home so can't check up on myself. Hopefully it is not too confusing.
 

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small pistol and small rifle primers have the exact same dimensions. Large rifle primers are deeper/thicker than Large pistol.
9mm does NOT have a rim. It is a tapered case. It head spaces on the case mouth. You need just enough TAPER crimp to eliminate the case mouth belling/flaring.
My hand priming tools see no difference between small pistol and small rifle or large pistol and large rifle primers.
Straight wall cases are NOT bottleneck cases, They do NOT grow and never need trimming. In fact, after many firings, they actually shrink.
You need to trim rimmed cases for revolvers since they need a roll crimp and the roll crimp practically demands that all cases be the same length.
9x19 and .45 Auto cases head space on the case mouth.
As you know, accuracy comes from minimizing head space. All 9x19 and .45 Auto cases are too short for minimum head space. As such, for best accuracy, measure your cases after sizing and set aside those that are within 0.005" of the max length. Use these for best groups and the shorter cases for plinking/practice.
I always full length size new cases, they get "out of round" during factory handling and shipping. Why play games--just size 'em and not worry.
All of this is covered in almost every reloading manual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for taking the time to answer my many questions...I have done exactly what you have advised. It is a relief to have people that really know reloading contributing to us new folks...My magnum loads are on the money. I'll load the 9mm tonight

Best Regards,

Fred
 
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