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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a lee mold 358-140-swc for 357 do I need to size these bullets after making, or are they alright to load and shoot they look very good and are to size and round when I measure them ?
 
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Technically its not that simple. Actually you need to slug your bore. The proper mold would then cast a bullet 1-2 thou larger. The end result would be little to no leading.

Since you have the mold by all means try it with a preferred lube, but you need to match the mold to your particular bore size given the tolerances stated above.

For your actual question, you don't state whether its a Tumble Lube style bullet or whether its a one or two lube groove type.

For tumble lube style bullets theres people who say that they never size them. Myself I size all bullets that I load period, TL or not.

Its all a matter of trial and error. What works for your weapon doesn't mean it will work for others. Its up to you to figure out what your pistol likes best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
its not a tumble lube but it has 3 groves in it . is there any damage that can be done if its not sized other than lead fouling?
 
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WELCOME to the forum !

I think we both have a general answer to your question overall but ... to get even a slight opinion more info is needed before I could imply anything. So here are questions to you. (Give us something to work with)

Why would you not want to size your bullets?
Why cast your bullets yet not follow protocol?

What is the measured size of your cast bullets?
Have you lubed them? What lube?

Is accuracy and severe leading of no consequence?

Have you fired this gun before? Hows the timing?

Its kinda of a hard question to address when the above questions remain atlarge.

The whole idea is to save money, to make better than factory ammo, to produce taylored ammo for accuracy reasons, while parallelling a safe load recipe.

its not a tumble lube but it has 3 groves in it . is there any damage that can be done if its not sized other than lead fouling?
Depends on who and how one goes about manufacturing your ammo, as well as the physical condition of the weapon itself.

Don't take these comment the wrong way thats not the intent as saftey has no bounds.

For that matter you may have tons more experience than me. But if you want a logical answer you have to provide concise details.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ok the reason I ask about resizing is because I had no idea there was such a thing when I orderd my mold.
the measured size is .358
I have not lubed them or loaded them or fired them.
I do not have a gun myself but a freind does so I got a mold to try and help him out .myself I have quit a bit of lead around that I make 12 gauge slugs with and thought this would be somethink else neet to do
 
G

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Typically, you should slug the bore and then order the mold accordingly. But if your barrel has 5 grove rifling then its hard to accurately measure the slug.

What I would suggest is to order a Lee Bullet Sizer Die kit in .357

Midway -linky

It is relatively cheap, plus you get a 4oz bottle of Lee Liquid Alox bullet lube with it in the kit. Its a pretty good system really. I got 3 or 4 kits of various calibers and sizes. I have now gone to other methods using Lubersizer systems and home made lubes etc..

Anyway, by ordering the .357 sizer kit you can enlarge it to say .358 should the .357 be to small.

IMO you really need to size the bullets cause of inconsistencies. for leading and accuracy sake.

Let us know the outcome! You're about to be bitten by the addiction.
 

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When shooting cast lead bullets, another consideration is the possible requirement for gas checks. "Cowboy" loads don't require them, but if you're shooting even moderately high velocity, you should add a gas check to your load.
 

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A gas check is a copper disk that is pressed on to the bottom of the bullet. It keeps pressure from seeping by the lead bullet when loading high velocity rounds.
A wad cutter is a lead bullet with a flat tip. It looks like you cut the end off of the bullet.
A semi wadcutter tapers slightly then has a flat tip.
Both styles of bullets are designed for target shooting so as to cut clean holes in the target paper.

Have a great day.
 
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You really need to do your research and buy some reloading manuals.

Find a local reloader by joining your local gun club or go to your local fun stores and ask where you can find the above.

You cant put the cart before the horse as in buying a mold then trying to reload with it first without the knowledge.

You need to develope a basic understanding of reloading cast bullets concepts. You only gain that by reading and reading more, buying books and again, researching. Google is your friend as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
ok thanks I didn`t think reloading with cast bullets would be all that different than using off the shelf bullets
 
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