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Just wondering the value and exact model of this pistol. To the best of my knowledge the pistol is chambered in 44-40. The top of the pistol reads: Smith & Wesson with dates ranging all the way until Dec 18 1877. The last part reads: Reissue, July 25, 1871.





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It looks like a S&W, New Model No. 3, single action revolver.

There were several variations and each variation has a different value. Serial #, cylinder length, exact caliber, and any and all other markings would be helpful in possibly identifying which variation you have.

Here's some generic info.

40% of New Model No.3's were exported, not only to Japan (the major foreign client), Argentina, and Australia, but to England, Spain, and other European countries, to Cuba and parts of Asia. Certain proof or other foreign stampings will add only slightly to the value of an otherwise standard revolver.

The standard model had a cylinder length of 1 and 7/16". The standard model had many different variations.

Values for the regular ole' standard model are very good = $750.00, excellent = $2,250.

If it's a standard model, State of Maryland model, it would be worth very good = $4,500.00, excellent = $10,000.00. Then there is the Japanese model, Japanese artillery model, Australian model, Argentine model, U.S. Revenue Cutter Service Issue model (forerunner to the U.S. Coast Guard). Value on the U.S. Revenue model is about the same as the State of Maryland model, the others are about the same, but a llittle higher than the plain standard model.

If the cylinder length is 1 and 9/16" is it possibly a S&W New Model No.3, Frontier Single Action. Values for this model are very good = $1,250.00, excellent = $3,500.00

For a true value, your revolver should be inspected by a for real expert, as I have shown that it may be worth as little as $725.00 or as much as $10,000.00.

I know this hasn't been much help, but you at least now have something to work with.

This info came from Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms and their values, 7th edition.
 

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You do have a SW New Model #3, which caliber and version remains to be seen. Let me point out that although some were shipped up to 1912 all of the frames were completed prior to 1898 therefore the ATF classifies all as antiques and are therefore not regulated. I would like to also point out that due to the trigger and hammer being cased and latch not being blued the gun has been refinished. It is a short extractor therefore not early production proably after 1882, it has fixed sights and is the most common barrel length, 6.5".
First off can you provide the serial number, if so I will check my data base and tell you what I can. Secondly measure the cylinder it has to be 1 9/16 to be chambered in 44-40,. With those two things I can tell you much more about your gun. If you don't want to post the serial number on line contact me offline or call my cell 936-661-6156.
[b]Sorry I just noticed in your picture you have cartridges chambered so you must have the correct chambering. First do not shoot smokeless loads in that gun the metallurgy is not the same as today and at the least it will stretch the frame at worst it will destroy the gun and possibly your hand maybe Pistoleros booker hook quote would be appropriatte.
As to the SW NM#3 Frontier (44-40 chambering) there were 2072 manufactured in their own serial number range, due to slow sales when the Japanese goverment needed guns 786 were pulled from stock and converted to 44 Russian.[/b][/b]
 
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