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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking at getting a Springfield XD45 in the 5" barrel but read where someone had problems in shooting SWC in it, has anyone else had any experiece with semi wad cutters in the XD45? Also what about the Taurus 24/7...same question, anyone with any real world experience with the Taurus and SWC's?
 

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johnclark

I have lots of experience with both of the guns you mentioned and about 78 others also as I have them in my rental counter at my shooting range.

The problem is not with XD or Taurus as opposed to the SWC in an auto.
The semi autos are not made to handle SWC ammo in the first place so to have a little problem with them is in my humble opinion not a surprise. I would be more surprised if you did not have a problem unless you have had your gun, (name one, automatic) that has not had the barrel throated.

Now having said that if you are even a little bit coordinated, you can do your own or take it to your favorite gunsmith and he will throat the barrel of your auto for very little money and then you can feed anything you wish to shoot. If it is done properly, you can feed empty brass reliably.

Hope this helps a little.

Frankly, before I ever wear a gun for self defense, I have the "reliability" package done. Which includes throating, tuning the ejector and other things to make the gun absolutely fool proof, if that is possible.

Take care and good shooting.

UF
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Aweseome info Fudd, I have never heard of Throating before. What is it and how do they do it. What other reliability measures do you suggest on a semi auto .45? Color me neophite to handguns. Am more used to rifles and scatterguns.
Thanks
 

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johnclark;

If you look at the barrel of you auto you will notice the front edge is quite sharp. Throating is basically polishing this edge off to a nice smooth, open face.
To throat the barrel of any semi auto IMO is critical prior to making it your primary, carry firearm for the very reason you mentioned about the SWC ammo.
The fits and clearances are very close on most semi auto pistols. It is not unusual to experience failures in the feeding process especially with new guns without this process being done even using factory, ball ammo.
I have also noticed a lot of problems with nearly all of the top of the line guns lately apparently due to a lack of QC at the factory and these failures and others seem to be more prevalent than ever. (sometimes I think they are making the clearances too close for semi autos) I know for a fact that we tell people to burn at least 500 to 1000 rounds through your gun prior to any tune-ups. And I know at least two other top drawer gunsmiths that do the same.
Perhaps it is just a spate and hopefully short term. But a whole lot of people are also posting asking questions about one failure or another with their new (name one) firearm.
I spoke with my in-house gunsmith yesterday and he tells me he is seeing a lot of it, especially with the new Kimbers at the moment. They either have NO QC or their QC is on break and has been for a while. More people should be contacting them to complain and they are not the only ones just one of the most popular.

As to other things to tune your auto, I have always had my ejector and extractor tuned to make sure I get positive clearance of the spent cartridges. Trigger work done so my carry guns are 3#s period just to name a few things.
But throating is essential to any carry pistol IMO before you ever put it on for that purpose.

I am not kidding about it feeding empty brass either. If done properly, you will never again experience a failure to feed due to your gun malfunctioning. You may still limp wrist it causing stove pipe, or even three point jams, but not because you gun fails to feed the round into an open chamber.

I guess I am a little paranoid, but I have had my gunsmith fit and or tune a complete sear, firing pin and spring, ambi safeties, recoil springs in different weights, magazines, (at least two spares), ejector and extractor just to name a few. These items are with me wherever I go. If I have a failure for any reason I can go to my BOB and get what I need, replace it and continue to carry or use the primary carry gun.
Example, I was at Thunder Ranch a few years ago and broke a recoil spring and a firing pin. It is the first and only time that has ever happened in over half a million rounds through my 1911s. I did not have to go to a backup gun, I just got out the parts I needed which had already been fitted, put them in and go on with a very expensive but fantastic class with my primary carry gun.
May not sound like much as I also had a backup 1911 just in case, but I was carrying a particular piece at the time and the reason for taking the H.I.T course in the first place was to train with everything I normally carry.
I have attended five courses at TR, some at Lethal Force Institute with Maas Ayoob, Louie Auerback, Gunsite, and several others over the years, not to mention all the courses I teach myself to civilian and LE. In the past 20 years I have not had to resort to changing guns, not once due to having the primary gun tuned prior to use and for keeping the things that normally break as spares.

Good luck and I sincerely hope this helps you. If you have any more questions you can do the same or PM or e mail me. I truly enjoy helping others and have been doing so for the past 36 or 37 years the past 20, full time.

Take are and good shooting.

UF
 

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I am a big Taurus revolver fan, but not so much on thier autos.

I would go with the XD :twisted: Freind of mine has an XD .40 and zero problems.
 
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