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I've seen slow-motion video of Glocks firing, the bullet is long gone before the slide even starts to move. Tuning your slide spring probably should consider other factors (how much felt recoil, prevent short stroking, slapping slide stop, etc.)
 

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Hi Asterrion,

The recoil spring absorbs the force of the moving slide, and stores that energy to move the slide foward to chamber the next round and close the action. Ideally, ti does not fully compress to stop the slide. You want the slide to bottom out on the frame, not on the compressed stack of spring coils.


By bottoming out on the frame,the force of the impact is borne by the recoil spring tunnel of the slide. If the recoil spring "stacks" and stops the slide, the recoil spring retainer, and the bushing, take the brunt of the deceleration. In time, the bushing or retainer may fail.

To check if your spring is stacking, remove the slide and take out the barrel. You might want to put safety glasses on at this point, in case the spring becomes airborn. To hold the the slide, Clamp it muzzle down in a paded vise. Install the bushing(buffer,if you are using one), spring and recoil guide rod. If it is not a full length guide rod be careful. Using the rod as a guide, compress the spring. If the spring stacks completely before you have pressed the quide into contact with the rear of the slide, you must shorten it.


A few coils off the spring will not decrease its strength. However if you have to take more than three or four coils, start over with the next step up in strength. Recoil springs can be cut with large sidecutters, but not easily. The steel is hard and strong. You can use the corner of the wheel on a bench grinder. Just go slow so you dont overheat the steel.

If you are using a shock buffer make sure to knock off any sharp edges, or corners off your freshly shortened spring.

Removing stacking is a good idea even if you are not to the point of noticing changes in weight. Doing this will add to the longevity of your gun.


This is a common practice on spring tuning 1911s. But in theory it should apply to all autos, (meaning slide and spring should not stack)

Hope this helps,take care Jack. :wink:
 

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Re: re: Tech question about Bullets and Slides

Pat T said:
I've seen slow-motion video of Glocks firing, the bullet is long gone before the slide even starts to move. Tuning your slide spring probably should consider other factors (how much felt recoil, prevent short stroking, slapping slide stop, etc.)
Did you know that the fist Glock 17s, did not have the captured spring rod. Gaston did this later so it didnt go flying across the room. I want to change my plastic one to a steel one.EFK Dragon makes one that is called a dual action spring. They are on the same logic to this method, only they are addressing this to the Glocks. If you search there sight you will see these, as well as regular captive ones like the plastic Glock stock ones, but with steel rod. They make the glock more accurate. The dual spring ones help to not let your frame take so much abuse, along with improving accuracy.

take care. Jack :D
 

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Jack62

I know those things look cool but a word of caution.

I had sold those steel rods for a while and have seen several of them break fairly quickly (less than 5,000 rounds).

I'm not sure how often you use your Glock but I would not recommend putting one on a gun I am going to bet my life on in an emer.

It's difficult to improve on what that guy has put on his guns from the factory.
I have his Glocks, all models in my rental counter, in my shooting range and some have exceeded 200,000 rounds prior to being submitted for trade in and never even break a spring.

I love to spend money to upgrade or personalize my guns but their are much better items to spend on than the steel guide rods for the Glock.

FYI.

Merry Christmas.

UF
 

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Asterrion said:
How much does the slide move before the bullit leaves the barrel? is there any math for this? i am trying to tune the recoil spring rate.

Thanks,
Knowing what pistol you're trying to "tune" would go a long way toward giving some good advice. They each have their own little quirks.
 
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Thanks Uncle fud, for this sound advice. This is good to know. My G22 is brand new in the box. I need to give it those few drops of oil, before i use it. I have been a 1911 guy for so long, looks like i have to change my mindset in owning the Glock. For lack of a better term, i think that i should make parts stronger with the Glock. I will heed your warnings, and just start using the gun and see what breaks. Hopefully nothing. Thanks again, Johnny :wink:


To the other Gentlemen up above me on this thread, (no disrespect as far as not using your name) I am posting from my Email messages, back to the sight . I havent loged in yet, cant roll back to catch your name. (hope this works)

Anyway, i thought the same thing, that you said as far as knowing what gun the original post starter, was refering to. As you can tell, i gave him the advice pertaining springs and such for 1911s. After posting i realized, Maybe he was not refering to a 1911. Hopefully he see's this and does not start cutting Glock springs or some other guns.

Have a great Holiday guys and stay safe, Johnny :D
 
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