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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have recently bought my first pistol, a .22 LR Hämmerli X-Esse STD.

It has been mostly unused due to failure to cycle and load new rounds properly -- i.e. it has been mostly at the dealership, spending time getting repaired.
Now after receiving the pistol back from being repaired for the second time I'm told it is simply supposed to be like this. I'm told no pistol fires all types of ammunition properly, and that my issue is ammunition related. The pistol uses .22 LR rounds and I'm giving it .22 LR rounds.

Shouldn't the pistol be able to fire all .22 LR rounds machined to the specifications of .22 LR rounds?

Is it true that no .22 LR pistol can fire all .22 LR rounds?

If it is true, why?
 

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It is very common for a particular pistol to prefer one or two brands of ammunition over the others. This preference, though, is generally expressed as a VERY OCCASIONAL failure to cycle or failure to feed.

Often, subsonic match ammo will not cycle an autoloader, but this can easily be remedied with a softer recoil spring. Likewise, the super-hot ammo will sometimes exhibit failure to extract or failure to feed (though ftf is usually a magazine-related problem).

If your problem is frequent and occurs regardless of ammo brand/type, there is definitely something wrong. Can you provide a good description of the problem?
 

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Second that note from WWB. Should work with most .22s. In addition to the subsonic ammo problem, some guns are very sensitive to the shape of the bullet itself. Truncated cones, found on some Hyper-velocity .22s may not feed properly. The way a factory sizes the bullet dimensions may affect feeding. If you have a gun with a match chamber at minimal dimensions and ammo that is sized on the large size, you may run in to problems. I have a Falcon barrel on my H-S Victor that will not shoot/chamber some brands at all. It loves Federal ammo, though.
Pete
 

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I believe Posix is referring to th events detailed in this thread.

+1 on Federal...I've fed my Hammerli almost nothing but Federal 36gr copper-plated bulk (with a bit of CCI LRN), and it works pretty well.
 

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Posix - I had forgotten about your earlier posts and your travail with this gun. Is the problem now still the same: bullets jamming after they are stripped from the magazine? The situation that you described in the other thread, the cartridge getting stuck and damaged w/o chambering, is almost always a magazine problem, either with the feed lips on the mag. or with the position of the mag in relation to the chamber.
High Standard magazines are infamous for getting out of "adjustment", resulting in the situation that you have described with your Hammerli. The difference there is that the H-S mags are steel and can be re-adjusted.
What brands and types of .22LR ammo have you tried?
Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi, thanks for the replies to everyone.

Yes, this is the same device as I posted issues about in my first post on this forum.

After the initial complaint to the dealership they discovered that there was in fact a fault in the mechanism locking the magazine in place, probably due to fabrication faults, or so they said, in any case that was repaired and the magazine itself has not jumped out since.

However, the pistol does not function properly despite this repair.

I gave it back to the dealership for a second time, to no avail, I was told they could find no flaw, and that it was probably ammunition related. The pistol was returned to me with no adjustments made except a disassembly, cleaning and polishing.
I have used at least five different types of ammunition, they all have issues.

The problem in general seems to be a mix of three things:

1: The feeding mechanism fails to load a bullet, the slider will close without a bullet chambered (i.e. not jammed either, just not picked up from the magazine).
2: The feeding mechanism grabs a bullet but the bullet jams. This seems to happen mostly with "Remington 22, "Golden Bullets", High Velocity Rimfire Cartridges".
3: The feeding mechanism works properly, a bullet is chambered, but fails to fire. When I cycle the mechanism again and attempt fire the same bullet which failed to fire, it sometimes fires, sometimes not.
4: The ejector mechanism fails to eject an empty cartridge. This issue seems to be related only to "hyper velocity", seemingly they are so powerful that the empty cartridge expands enough to make it hard to extract from the entrance to the barrel.

Because I feel it is not my responsibility to debug an issue like this I have not kept a journal (although I did one session prior to my first visit back to the dealership) over exactly how many bullets fail and how; but I would estimate that for 80 bullets at least 5 will fail for various reasons.

I will keep a formalized and strict journal on issues from now on.

Types of ammunition I have used:

* "Remington 22, "Golden Bullets", High Velocity Rimfire Cartridges"
* "ELEY TARGET .22 RF long rifle"
* "CCI Standard Velocity"
* Some hyper velocity ammunition I sadly do not remember the name of.
* Some other high velocity ammunition I sadly to not remember the name of.

Please excuse my poor terminology and lack of understanding of the inner workings of pistols.
 

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Just from my own experience -
1- Though I use Remington components when I reload, I do not use their .22s. I have found them unreliable in my guns - chambering and not firing.
2 - I never use anything but standard velocity .22s in my .22 pistols. I don't see the need. Your assessment of the #4 problem is most probably correct.
The failure of the bolt to pick up a new cartridge could be either the bolt or the magazine. Probably the magazine. I'm just guessing that because in my experience most problems like you've described are magazine related. The stripping of a cartridge which then gets hung up, I'm assuming that it hangs up on the mouth of the chamber, is a result of the feed lips on the magazine being either too close together (which could also cause the failure to strip a round) or too open. I can never remember which way it goes; too tight or too loose, one causes the cartridge to feed high and the other to feed low - both jam.
Have you tried another magazine?
Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Re: re: Types of ammunition for .22 LR pistol?

darkgael said:
Just from my own experience -
1- Though I use Remington components when I reload, I do not use their .22s. I have found them unreliable in my guns - chambering and not firing.
2 - I never use anything but standard velocity .22s in my .22 pistols. I don't see the need. Your assessment of the #4 problem is most probably correct.
The failure of the bolt to pick up a new cartridge could be either the bolt or the magazine. Probably the magazine. I'm just guessing that because in my experience most problems like you've described are magazine related. The stripping of a cartridge which then gets hung up, I'm assuming that it hangs up on the mouth of the chamber, is a result of the feed lips on the magazine being either too close together (which could also cause the failure to strip a round) or too open. I can never remember which way it goes; too tight or too loose, one causes the cartridge to feed high and the other to feed low - both jam.
Have you tried another magazine?
Pete
The product came with two magazines, and the problem seems to occurs regardless of which magazine is used.

However I have not performed a proper test where I take notes since the issue related to magazine jumping out upon firing.

I will need to do that before I can be sure, but I'm quite sure it happens regardless of which magazine is used -- I usually fill up both magazines and empty both before I iterate the process again.
 

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With both mags. Hmmm. The other possiblity - though you said that Hammerli looked at the gun - is that the mags themselves are in the wrong position relative to the breech face (a little too high or a little too low). This could also contribute to the failure to strip a round.
The difference does not have to be much to cause a problem. Example: I had an upper (receiver and barrel) for my Ruger Mk.II.
It was loose on the frame a tad. I placed a very thin brass shim - a few thousandths thick - to take up the slack. The gun, super reliable, would not feed from any magazines with that shim in.
Pete
 
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