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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a non-functioning gun that belonged to my great-grandfather that I would like to know a little bit more about. It is pretty worn down and some of the markings have been worn down, but it appears the name of the company that made it is Hawkins & Allen Mfg. Co. It has a patent date on the gun which says Mar. 28, 71 and Jan. 5, 81. After this, it says .38 Cal. Centre Fire. It has the numbers 2137 written on it. I'm assuming this is a model number, but I'm not sure.

I’m assuming it was made before the 1930’s based on its ownership, but I’m unsure of this. The first name of the company is a little worn, so it may actually be Elkins or Wilkins or something of this sort. The “kins” is the only part clearly visible.

I've done the typical Google search, but I haven't been able to turn anything up on it. I'm just curious as to when and where it was made and where I could find more info on it. Thanks for any help.
 

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The manufacturer is most likely "Hopkins & Allen", and the number is almost certainly the serial number.

I don't know much about them, as they are not really considered collectible.... in their day, they were an inexpensive, utilitarian pistol. Yours has sentimental value only.

It may well date to before the turn of the century, based on the 4-digit serial number.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great. Thanks. You can tell by looking at it there is no monetary value, but we have had it forever and never knew much about it. Now that I know the name of the company, I should be able to find more info.
 

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Jetty:Hopkins & Allen is a very old American firearms maker. The gun you have is probably from around 1900. 2137 is probably the Serial Number-it should be found on the butt, the bottom of the handle.The other numbers would probably be patent dates. H&A made cartridge revolvers very early, in fact the company is decended from some much earlier companies-Allen & Wheelock, Allen &Thurber, several more. It is possible this revolver is chambered for the .38 S&W cartridge, still available, but if it is as early as I think and in poor condition, I would not attempt to shoot it.

Try this site: www.armscollectors.com/faq.htm and find the H&A forum. One of the posters there is Bill Goforth, probably the foremost expert on these revolvers.

FWIW, they were very common-many working people relied on them for protection and they got lots of carry and little respect.
M<any of them still work just fine-possibly yours will too after a good cleaning.
Please post a pic if you can, and further description.
Length of barrel, blue or plated, number of shots, top break, side gate,etc.
Note-Grips if black may be hard rubber and they are very easy to break-don't try to remove them without instructions.
Since it is a family piece, I'd clean it and keep it- you won't gain much money by selling it.
Enjoy it.
mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Here's a picture of it. It is a five shot that loads from the side. It's a neat little gun, but it's not functioning because you can lock the hammer back, but the trigger doesn't release the hammer. Since we would never shoot it, we've never bothered getting it repaired. I would never sell it, but I am glad to know a little bit more about it now. It makes sense that it would be used for self-defense, because it looks like it could be concealed pretty easily if necessary.

 

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Thanks for the pic. You have an interesting old revolver due to the long barrel length (measure fron the tip of the barrel to the end right before the cylinder for the barrrel length). Most were short 2 1/2 to 3 1/2", as well as the lanyard ring on the butt.
( I have never seen one with the lanyard ring.)

FWIW, cock the hammer and spray inside the hammer area with WD40 to remove hard old grease. Allow the gun to drain over paper towels, and repeat this a few times. (Probably good to do this outside) Also spray in the trigger slot in the frame, and work the action to loosen grease.
I'd not remove the grips-they appear to be in very good condition and they are quite easy to break (from sad experience) and nearly impossible to replace.
The small vertical lever on the left frame in front of the cylinder will allow you to remove the center pin from the frame, and the cylinder can then be removed. Spray the works through the slots and holes in the frame with WD40 , let drain, then add a few small drops of a light machine oil to all these spots, re-assemble and work the action a few times to get the oil spread around.

This is an interesting revolver, and would have been a pretty good defense gun in its day, given the long barrel and .38 S&W caliber.
I would estimate it was made about 1890.
It certainly deserves a good retirement as a family heirloom.
You are fortunate to have it.

mark
 
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